"
Newspaper Archive of
The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
Lyft
November 14, 2002     The Hogansville Herald
PAGE 4     (4 of 10 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 4     (4 of 10 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
November 14, 2002
 

Newspaper Archive of The Hogansville Herald produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Opinions & Ideas i: PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - Nov. 14, 2002 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS usPs 62oo40 MiUard B. Cdme Pm:lent PUBI JSHER/ADVERTIS FNG DIRECIDR Jonn KW/mNDAtL ASSOCIATE PUBLISt IFJ,JEDITOR ROB FdOtARDSON ASSISTANT EDI'IX)R JAWX N BUSINESS MANAGER Phone (705) 846-3188. Fax (705} 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 HogansviUe. Georgm 30230 How Will This Work Out for Georgia? I have long been a sup- porter of Lieutenant Governor Mark Taylor and for many reasons. Taylor has been good for Georgia in his first term. He is a man of the people, at least in this writer's opinion. While Taylor is not break- ing new ground as Lieutenant Governor, he will be break- ing new ground as a Democrat serving with a Republican Governor. Or will he? Sonny Perdue made his- tory by being elected Georgia's Governor. Perdue is the first Republican to serve as Governor of Georgia since 1872. Georgia is the only state that did not elect a Republican governor during the 20th century. Roy Barnes also made history. Georgia has not denied a Democrat a second term in office since the law was changed to allow George Busbee to seek eight consec- utive years in 1978. Not exact- ly a good way to go down in history. There were many issues that led to Barnes' demise, but the state flag issue had to Taylor has shown that they have in common, is a true desire to improve our .schools, our economy and take a tougher stand on crime. Whether Republican or Democrat, if they are truly concerned about those issues, they will make decisions based on what is best for Georgia and its citizens and not on party values. TAYLOR PROBABLY said it best when asked by the media how he feels the com- bination will work. "I will work positively with him and work for Georgians," he said. Taylor said he is excited about his second term in office. He should be, with a Republican governor it makes him the highest-pro- filed Democrat in state gov- Front Porch Should Come Back (Written in 1988) I was driving through the outskirts of the city the other day and I saw a man sitting on a front porch. It was an older house and he was an older man. Modern houses don't have front porches anymore, and even if they did, younger men have far too much to do to sit on them. I'm not certain when the front porch all but disap- peared from American life, but it probably was about the same time television and air- conditioning were being installed in most every home. Why sit out on the porch where it's hot and you man get mosquito-bit when you can sit inside where it's comfort- cooled and watch Ozzie and Harriet? Even if an architect designs a porch today, it's usu- ally placed in the back of the house where the hot tub is. If we do venture out of our houses today, it's usually to get in the hot tub. If Americans continue spending all that time in their hot tubs, we may all eventu- ally shrink down like the Lilliputians and become prunelike from boiling our- selves one too many times. I grew up in my grand- parents' home. They had a front porch; we spent a lot of time sitting on it. My grandmother would shell butterbeans. My grand- father would listen for trains. There comes the mail train to Montgomery," he'd say, pulling his watch out. of his pocket. "She's running four minutes late." I LEARNED a lot sitting on the front porch with my grandparents. How to shell butterbeans. How to f'md the Big Dipper. How to wait for a mosquito to alight and then slap that sucker dead. What -a pleasure it is to listen for trains. Our neighbors often dropped by and sat on the front porch with us. "It was awful what hap- pened to Norvell Temw, was- n't it?" a neighbor would say. 'hat happened to him?" my grandmother would ask, looking up from her butter- beans. "Got three fingers cut off down at the saw mill." Something else I learned on the front porch -- not to include sawmilling in my future. But even my grandpar- ents eventually moved inside. They bought a television and enclosed the front porch and made it a den. My grandfather enjoyed westerns. My grandmother never once missed a Billy Graham sermon or a tele- vised wrestling match. The to get along by itself that. Perhaps if front came back and ed sitting learn to relax more and to one another more, being bitten by a would at least be some tact with nature. I probably should stopped and talked man on the porch and his opinion on all of this. I probably should stopped and man on the porch and his opinions on all of this. I would have, too, was late for my tee time. BY SPECIAL BTrH HIS WIDOW NEWS IS CARRYING COLU?CLNS BY THE LATE GRIZZARD, BY MORELAND, AND MOST WIDELY READ S TIME. ABLEFOt PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX GA 31118-1266 AND WIDE. Appreciating the Glory of the House During my days growing up in extreme North Georgia, almost every Sunday after church and after the noon meal, my dad would pile us all in the car and take us for a drive. We would take drives through small towns and through the countryside. As we drove, I learned to look at all the different sights. After marriage, that same tradition became a somewhat frequent part of our lives. When God allowed me to start pastoring churches, we ttl be st d:,While:some eminent, wouttake thee drives,  opposed ging the flag, Taylor said he believes his others liked the new design, positive campaign on the but most Georgians agreed that the people should have been given the right to make the decision. Had Barnes had enough foresight to place the flag on referendum, he might still be Georgia's governor today. look at,the.same sights, but a new attraction caught my attention. Now I would notice all the church buildings we would pass. We would see old ones, new ones, big ones and small ones. Some were well kept and some were not. As we drive down the road today and see the magnificent buildings and stand in awe at some of the things we see, let's ask the question, "What does give the church house its glory?" PROBABLY the most magnificent church house was Solomon's Temple. The great temple of Solomon took 180,000 workers seven years to build. The floors and walls BACK TO THE issue at hand. Georgia will have a Republican governor and a Democrat for a lieutenant governor. How is that going to work? Probably pretty well for many reasons. First of all, it is important to remember that Perdue was a Democrat long before he was a Republican. While he declares himself a Republican, he still has a lit- fie Democrat in him. I think record of the HOPE scholar- ship is what gave him a sec- ond victory. However, he is being modest. Prior to this election, a friend and I were talking and I predicted that Georgia would have a Republican gov- ernor and a Democrat as lieu- tenant governor. It didn't take a rocket scientist to figure out how this election would turn out. As I said, the flag issue and others buried Barnes, while Taylor has been really respected. I'M REALLY EXCITED about the combination of Perdue and Taylor. I believe this will turn out to be an interesting four years, for many retsons. I also believe this could many people will be str- be a very productive four prisedlowheandTaylormay years if Perdue and Taylor think a like on many issues. \\;, work together. By taking the For the most part, Taylor "\\;best of the Republican way has been conservative in his 0fthinkingandthebestofthe first term. He has shown innovative thinking and has always seemed to listened to the concerns of the people of Georgia on most issues. While Taylor proclaims to be a Democrat, he has some Republican ideas and ways as weLL So, Perdue and Taylor will probably make a pretty good team as long as party issues do not become a factor. One thing Perdue and Democratic way of thinking we could really have an administration could be very productive. However, the simple issue to the matter is this. Perdue and Taylor are both good men with strong morals and a desire tmake Georgia better. All they have to do is follow their convictions and do what they know to be right. If they do that, it will work fine. THE HOGANSWILLE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-MercuD' Publishing Cy, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Ro(vett Highway. Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620400. Subscription rates by mail: $18 in Troup. Harris or Meriwether Counties; $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all :'sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville, ia 302). FOR  call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager. Star Mercury Publications, R O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. POSXMASae, Send  changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansville. GA 302). Publisher and Advertising Director ............................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ........................................................... John Kuykendall Business Manager ................................................................................. Jayne Cfldston Assistant Editor ...................................................................................... Rt Riehard.,m Staff Writers .......................................................................... B,m Geter. Billy Br2ant Assistant Advertising Manager. ................................................................. Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ........................................................................................ Linda Dester Composing ................................................................. Dewayne Flowe. Valinda'lve Circulation Manager .................................................................................... Judy Crevs Legals ...................................................................................................... Jayne Goldston Pressroom Manager ........................................................................ Wayne Gffchowski Presto ....................................... .David Boggs, LarD' College. Shanntm Atkinm Com,opalx OmcFas President ............................................................................................. Millard B. Grimes Vice President. ......................... . ....................................................... Charkme S. Grimes Secretary ......................................................................................... J.aura Grimes Coter Treasurer ....................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Gatrett Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary ............................................... James S. Grimes were made of stone, covered with wood and overlaid with gold. All this was accomplished without the sound of any tool at the work site. However, with all the grandeur of such a work and with all the splen- dor of the great edifices we see today, the secret to the glory of the church house has yet to be told. With beautiful interiors, prestigious mem- bers, large bank accounts, polished preachers, and a well run administration, there man still be lacking that which provides the church house with its glory. IN I Kings 8, Solomon is dedicating his magnificent temple and it is in this dedi- cation the glory of the house man be found. After the dedi- cation prayer was finished, the presence of the Lord filled the house. Herein lies the glory of the house: the real presence of God himself. Too many times folks assemble at God's house and go through a set in stone list of rituals that do not amount to any- thing. To some, if there has been some singing, a prayer, and a sermon, they are satisfied. Where are the real Spirit "Now I would notice all the church buildings we would pass. We would see old ones, new ones, big ones small ones." filled services when sinners get saved, the saints get revived and the Savior is hon- ored? In the Bible, especial- ly in relation to Solomon's temple, we can find four things that are significant to realizing the real presence of God in a worship service. I am not speaking of something mystical, just the fact that God wants to meet with his people in the house they have built to meet with him. One man said, "The con- stancy of God's presence nothing can change, but the consciousness of God's pres- ence, anything man chan God has promised never l leave nor to forsake his dren, but many times we so out of tune with him have no realization that with us. It is that we need back into services. Although God the Spirit is all powerful, He not force himself into a He is not people so program their ship services that there is room for the Spirit to do work, we mi3theoint meeting together.., Without the Holy working in the ice, the lost man will not convinced he needs a (John 16:8), and the child God cannot really (John 4:24). LORD WILLING in days to come, we ine those Old Testament sages that will teach us to really see the Hol' move in our services. meantime, may we as children leave room in lives for the Holy Spirit t take the it to reprove, us into the way us togo. I'm Definitely Not a Party Person Just what man you and I expect as predominately rural Southerners in the State of Georgia now that Republicans have been elect- ed to control our state gov- ernment for the next four years? My guess is that we will experience very little differ- ence in the import_ant things. Policies and thinking on rad- ical plans in both party plat- forms draw closer each year. I firmly believe it is the individual candidates not the party that makes the differ- ence most of the time. IN LAST WEEK'S General Election in Meriwether County, Democratic candidates won most state races by a 60% margin. However, Tyron Elliott, a local Republican seeking a state senate #14 ost as a Republican, won his home county by over a 60% margin. While many voters still vote according to party lines, more voters each year "cross over" during our general elections and vote for the can- didate, not the party. There is no way I man explain the failure of the once dominant Democratic party in Georgia except to say it should come as no surprise. Most of our neighboring southern states like Texas, Florida, Tennessee and even Mississippi have been elect- ing Republican governors and U.S. Senators for sever- al years. Georgia seems to be the last to fall in line in elect- ing state Republicans with the exception of the late Senator Paul Coverdale. Several years Georgia has had a majority of Republicans in Congress. Mac Collins, who has been We welcome your letters. Hease mail them to: The Hogansville Home News P O. Box 426 Hoansville, Georgia 30230 Please fax them to: 7O6-846-2206 P/ease be sure to inc/ude an address andphone number (for trificatm). redistricted out of Talbot and Meriwether counties, has always been popular in both counties, not because of party affiliation, but because he responded to the needs of the electorate. Mac Collins could always carry both Talbot and Meriwether as few if any Republicans could. It is good to see our voters begin to cast ballots for the person, not the party. We have heard comments that President Bush swung a close election in favor of the Republican candidates with his visits to Georgia a few days prior to the election. This is giving the president too much credit, I think. IT IS my belief that many voters were fed up with a bunch of "cocky talking" man- didates who got some candi- dates' message you have to accept certain decisions whether you like it or not. Most people like to reserve the right to make their own decision on how to vote. No one was more pro Democrat and Roosevelt than my late father. In 1938 Roosevelt came Barnesville and Lawrence Camp for Senator over Senator E George and Eu Talmadge. I remember grandfather saying, farmers and poor folks port President Roosevelt. I sure hope he runs term, but he needs to himself in Washington, not come down here us how to vote." George won the primary in 1938, Talmadge was- second, Roosevelt's "hand- stooge," as Lawrence Camp, distant third. There is no doubt mind that more and Georgia voters will disre former attachments to a ical party, whether it Democrat or Republican. Just today I heard good friend Senator Lee was considering ing to the Republican Knowing him as well as I I would not he changed political would make a bit of ence in the way he votes. More voters seem to voting for the not the party. This is how I feel!