"
Newspaper Archive of
The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
Lyft
November 16, 2000     The Hogansville Herald
PAGE 4     (4 of 12 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 4     (4 of 12 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
November 16, 2000
 

Newspaper Archive of The Hogansville Herald produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Opinions & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - NOVEMBER 16, 2000 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-040 A Gmnc uldtcaon Mlnard B. Gdmes, President ,MIKE HALE PUBIASI tI,]ADVER'I'ISING DIRECrOR JOHN KUYKENDALL ASS( K:IA'I'E PUBLISHER]EDrrOR BRYAN GETER AS.)CIATE EDrrOR JAYNE GOLDS'raN BUSINF2S MANAGER ['hone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 E O. Box 426 t logansville, Georgia 30230 Election Confusion Occurs Regularly At some point before January 1, 2001, we will surely know who our 43rd president will be. Please remember, due to deadline pres- sures, this column has to be writ- ten on Friday. So, if by some coin- : cidence we do know whoour pres- ident is before the paper goes out, I don't want to come off looking like I don't know what's really going on. Some newspaper edi- tors did just that recently. Some newspaper editors got a little ahead of themselves and printed a Wednesday,. November 8th issue declaring Bush as the winner. The editors, apparently pay- ing more attention to their hunch- es than the actual election, erred big time Wednesday morning and printed early editions declaring George W. Bush the winner. Heads up people, this could be a chance to turn this election into a few dollars. In 1948, the Chicago Daily Tribune printed a headline that read "Dewey Defeats Truman." A copy of that newspaper recently sold for $405 on an online auction. So, if the recount declares Gore the winner, those editions will be worth a pretty penny to collec- tors. If:ot worth the paper eyre printed on. Among the newspapers mak- ing the blunder, but not all of them, were Georgia's own Atlanta Constitution, Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch, KanSas City Star, The New York Post, and Virginia Daily Press. Some of the newspapers are ! already on the auction block with : prices ranging from $1 to $100. So, if you think Gore is a sure thing, why not buy one and cash in on the deal. ; NO DOUBT, the blunders of this election will be remembered :" well for the next four years, and : it will no doubt be brought up again in-depth before the next : presidential election. While the : election can be described in many words, 'oring" is definitely not i one of them. This has truly proved [ to be an exciting election and one that will go down in history. i While reflecting on the pres- :: idential election and the Electoral College, maybe it's time for a his- ::i tory lesson. Georgia,ce had an election system calle d the County i Unit System, which'is a version of the Electoral College. Under i the County Unit System, guber- natorial candidates won their . races by carr.g the most coun- i" ties, not necessarily the one who had the most popular votes. The system called for the . state's eight most populous coun- i: ties to have six county,unit votes i each, the next largest 30 counties ;' were given four and the remain- :" ing 121 counties had two votes each. Quick math will tell you that Georgia's rural areas always determined the Governor, not necessarily the popular vote. Under the system, the small coun- ties controlled more votes than the state's 38 largest counties. Of course, the winning candidate was the one that carried the widest geographic area of the state. This allowed candidates to concentrate on the rural areas during an election and ignore the urban counties. Back then, peo- ple said that pine trees counted more than people did in an elec- tion, Like the Electoral College, the County Unit System resulted in the election of a chief executive who received fewer votes than his opponent. In the governor's race in 1946, Gene Talmadge won the Democratic primary by car- vying more counties, even though Atlanta businessman James Carmichael had the most popu- lar votes. Talmadge died before he could take office, setting in motion the events that led to Georgia's "three governors" con- troversy. It was that election that resulted in the downfall of the County Unit System. In 1962, federal courts final- ly ruled against the election process. The decision forced Georgia to elect its governors by popular vote and to reapportion the General Assembly into dis- tricts with roughly equal popula- tions. Carl Sanders won the gov- ernor's race that same year large- ly with the support of voters from Georgia's urban counties. HISTORY will long remem- ber a quote written by Bobby Rowan about the court ruling, who was among the first state senators elected after the County Unit System failed. "This helped return political power to the peo- ple - giving them a direct means of protecting their rights and responsibilities through repre- sentative government." While I'm not necessarily opposed to the Electoral College process, I do believe it is time for America to rethink the process. THE HOGANSVU.LE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Slat-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications. at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subription rates by mail: $16 in Troup, Heard or Meriwether Counties; $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all :,Jes "taxes. Second class postage paid at HogansviUe. Georgia 302.30. FOR StgSCRIPrlONS call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager. Star Mercury Publications. E O. Box a26. Manchester. Georgia 31816. POSTMAgr: Send'address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansvill, GA 30230. STAFF Publisher and Advertising Director .................................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ................................................................. John Kuykendall Associate Editor .................................................................................................. Bryan Geter Aistant Editor .......................................................................................... Rob Rich'son Business Manager ....................................................................................... Jaync Goldston Staff Writers ..................... : ................................................. Michael C. Snider. Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager ........................................................................ Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ................................................................................................. Lori Camp Assi "stant Editor ........................................................................................... Rob Richardson Composing .................................................... Valinda lvexy, Deborah Smith. Lauren King Legals ............................................................................................................ Jayne Goldston Receptionis! and Classifieds., .......................................................................... Cleta Young Production Manager .............................................................................................. Todd Laird Pressroom ................................................................. David Boggs and Wayne Grochowski COm,OnAT OCY.S President .................................................................................................... MiUard B. Grimes Vice President ........................................................................................ Charlo S. Grimes Secretary ................................................................................................ Laura Grimes Cofer Treasurer .............................................................................................. Kathy Grimes C_rarmtt Getting Rid of Ants Surely No I was home visiting the folks in Moreland, Georgia, and my stepfather, H.B., and I walked out into the front yard. Over near the driveway, I noticed a couple of large anthills. "I've tried everything I know to get rid of these ants," said my stepfather. "I even put grits on them." For a second, I thought he had said he put grits on the ants, but you'd have to be about half-addled to do something like that, and H.B. is, without doubt, of sound mind. I know a lot about grits. I know they are misunderstood. The rea- son people from regions other than the South don't like grits is they have never had them pre- pared properly. THEY ARE TRAVELING through the South and stop at a Hojo for breakfast andthe wait- ress serves them grits with their eggs and bacon. They're probably instant grits to begin with, and I'm sure it's in the Bible somewhere that instant grits are an unholy hybrid of the real thing. Also, our travelers don't know to put butter on their grits and then stir their eggs and bacon into them and salt and pepper to taste. So their grits taste awful. And when they return home, they are asked, "Did you have any grits?" And they say, "The worse thing we ever ate. Almost ruined our trip to Disney World." But grits on an anthill? "You didn't really put grits on these ant beds, did you?" I said to my stepfather. "That's exactly what I said. Putting grits on ant beds is an old remedy for getting rid of ants." "Giving Northerners unbut- tered instant grits is an old rem- edy for getting rid of tourists, too," I said. "What's supposed to happen," H.B. went on, "is the ants try to eat the individual little grits and they get so full they explode and die:" I'VE HEARD OF other old remedies. I know if you put tobac- co juice on a bee sting, it will quit hurting. I know to put a pork chop around an ugly child's neck to get the dogs to play with him, and I know if you bury a dishrag under a full moon your warts will go away. But, grits on an anthill? "Giving Northerners unbut- tered instant grits is an old remedy for get- t/ng rid of tourists, tOo..." So I asked, "Itow are the grits working on the ants?" "These ants," answered H.B., "don't seem to be interested in grits." "Aha!" I said. "They're Northern ants." - "How do you know?" "Elementary," I said. refuse to eat grits, and many of them are dais with black socks." I told my stepfather worry about the ants. on their way to Disney a matter of days. BY SPECIAL WITH HIS WIDOW, ED GRIZZARD, WHO GREW NEARBY MORELAND. GEORGIA WRITER OF GRIZZARD BELONGED TO AMERICA BELONGED TO THIS OF WHICH HE SO OFTEN OF 1-85 FROM NEWNAlq HOGANSVILLE IS NAMED HONOR. THE LEWIS MUSEUM WAS' MORELAND IN 1996, AND A ING AND EDITING lAB IS DEDICATED TO HIS BELOVED TAPES ARE SALE THROUGH BAD PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 BOOK AND MUSIC NATIONWIDE. FDR's Legacies Many, Far-Reaching (Last in a series of articles on Roosevelt and West Georgia) They held Founder's Day in Warm Springs as usual in 1945. There was a lot to be thankful for. The great war was over. The effort to end the scourge of polio had more money at its disposal -- by the millions of dollars -- than ever before. The Georgia Warm Springs Foundation was in good finan- cial shape (in targ iht't'due to the $560,000 it received from the insurance companies on the death of Roosevelt; his death produced other immediately noticed profit -- for example, $6,000 in royalties from Pocket Books for Franklin Delano Roosevelt, a Memorial). But it was a sad affair. They left an empty chair at the head table, and the patients and staff all said silent prayers with that chair in mind. Ten years later, the National Foundation announced that field trials of the Salk polio vac- cine developed in foundation- sponsored research had proved that the disease could be pre- vented. The announcement came on April 12. It was wide- ly assumed that this date was chosen because of its anniver- sary significance. It was just the sort of thing O'Connor would do, in the view of his many crit- ics. In fact, it was a coincidence, according to the respected sci- entist in charge of evaluating the tests and making that eval- uation public. But what if the announce- ment had been contrived? The virologist Tom Rivers put it nicely: "There could be no quar- rel with such a decision. What if the report had been delayed three or four days? President Roosevelt had been the founder of the National Foundation; Mr. O'Connor had been one of his closest friends - Hell, they start- ed everything -- without them there would have been no Foundation, and I dare say, no Salkvaccine. Why shouldn't the report be given on that day? It was fitting." In any case, the Salk Vaccine proved to be remarkably effec- tive in eliminating the scourge of polio. From one of the most feared of infectious diseases in the first half of the 20th centu- ry, it has become almost unknown in the United States, and in the rest of the world where medical science has pen- etrated. The vaccine is one of the most important legacies from Franklin Roosevelt's associa- tion with Warm Springs, and the community's crucial role in raising money through the Foundation for the development of a vaccine to prevent polio. THERE ARE MANY other legacies, of course. Just in recent months, a replica of the train station where Roosevelt arrived for his Warm Springs visits has been erected and is the headquarters for the Meriwether County Tourism Association. The Little White House has been a historical site and a "Why s houldn't the report be given on that day? It was fit- ting." major tourist attraction almost from the year Roosevelt died there. The Warm Springs Rehabilitation Center has passed through several rein- carnations, with its role expand- ed to include other diseases and handicapped persons after polio was virtually conquered. Warm Springs and other cities in the area, such as Dowdell's Knob and Roosevelt State Park are major attrac tions. They were truly part of history, as surely as any battle site or other presidential home. Time Magazine this year selected Roosevelt as its Leader of the Century and runner-up as the Person of the Century tO the scientisL Albert Every survey and Presidents I top three, along with Lincoln and Washington. IN THE YEAR Roosevelt would be espe pleased to see his of Georgia as one of the t growing states, up ulation in 20th Wheh ' It here. ': ' : The poverty ditions which observed on his many Georgia had a i on his presidential the program which broadened the Class and provided a more secure economy, cially for the South. Editor's note: in the series of Roosevelt, adapted book, The Squire of Springs by Theo Lippmann wrote the 1977, inspired to an the election of Jimmy Plains, Georgia to cy. Lippmann is proceeds from the sale book to the Center and copies are at the Little White shop and may also be through other book storeS. Lippmann, a for The Atlanta( the Baltimore Sun, is retired and lives Baltimore. Holiday Season Is Upon Us, Again The other day while driving down the parkway in LaGrange, there were workers attaching something to the light poles along the road. As I got closer and my eyes focused upon the objects, the men were hanging images of angels, snowflakes, and other things that we relate to Christmas. I'm not sure ffit's just me or does it seem that each year the holiday season tends to begin earlier and earlier? Growing up in extreme North Georgia, it seemed as if the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays would never get here. Now it seems as if they never leave because there are some places which never cease to sell their Christmas products. I am not condemning these practices, just making an observation. As the signs of the season begin to spring up, may we be reminded of the real reason we can enjoy such a festive season. In about a week, we will enjoy a day that Americans look forward to year after year. That day is Thanksgiving, to say the least, the day kicking off the holiday season. There will be families gathering around a bountiful table, there will be children watching parades, there will be men watching football games and the ladies will be planning their day after Thanksgiving shopping. In their place all of these traditions suri"ounding Thanksgiving are enjoyable. A few days ago while in my study at the church, the Lord seemed to deal with my heart about making sure we start the holiday season off right. Sure, we can plan our meals, our fam- ily gatherings and even our Christmas dinners. But may I submit for our hearts consider- ation that before we get so caught up in the season, let's stop and remember the reason we can have the opportunity to celebrate such a time. With Thanksgiving just around the corner, may we begin it all by stopping to give thanks to God in Heaven for his bountiful blessings, before we get so caught up in the yearly traditions. The Bible tells us in James 1:17, "Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above, and cometh down from the Father of lights, with whom is no variableness, neither shadow of turning." In order to try and make sure we keep God first this holiday season, we here at Antioch Baptist Church want to get things started off right. This weekend' we will have our annual church- wide Thanksgiving dinner, but there is something new On Sunday, November 19,  have our first Thanksgiving Sunday the 19th, we special singing b3 Trio from LaGrange and: preaching by Dr. Greg from Rossville. Bro. Greg man who ordained me assistant The special time ing Sunday School at Good News Sunday night, with us and Bro. Gre ing, night the 20th, Good News will be are looking for a special weekend, and I, as members of Antioch to invite each of be a part of this It is our goal it begin season by putting God praising him for his derful blessing see