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November 20, 2003     The Hogansville Herald
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November 20, 2003
 

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Opinions & Ideas THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS ' USPS 620-040 . (6finut ubliratimt Millard B. Grimes, President JOHN KWKENDAIJ PUBLISHF3tfEI)ITOR LAURIE LEWIS AI)VERTISIN(; DIRE, L"I'OR CLINT CIAYBR(X)K ASS U.:IA'rE EDrroR ROB RICHARDSON A&SlSTANT EI)ITOR JAYNI. GOLDSrON B U SINI';&"; MANA(;ER o Phone (706) 846-318S. Fax (706) 846-2206 12 O. Box 4,26 I hJRansville, Georgia 30230 As Far as I Know, I'm Still Free to Choose... Last week Alabama's Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, Roy Moore, sat in same courtroom he has presided over for many years, not as judge, but as a defendant. For the judge, it had to be new feel- rag, for so many years he has decided issues about law and now he was defending himself against the same laws he has upheld. Now known as the "Ten Commandments Judge," Moore was told he has every rightto acknowledge God, but does not have the right to place himself above the law. Many believe that the his- loric decision by the state Court of the Judiciary ends the judicial career of Moore. I don't think that's the case at all. When Moore left the court- room, many of his supporters stood and cheered for him. Moore argues that he has not broken any law. "I have done what I was sworn to do," he said after hearing the deci- sion by the court. "This is about whether or not you can acknowledge God as a source of our laws and our liberty. That's all I have done." Whether I aee with oore /I$'6h '"roval of ttte Ten Commandments or not is not at issue. Personally, it is my believe that we are a nation that is quickly turning away from God and will pay dearly for it. However, that is a col- umn for another time. The question here is, did Moore break the law? There are arguments that could be made both ways on that issue, per- sonally, I do not believe he broke any laws. For it was a ruling, not a written law, that sought the removal of the Ten Commandments from the court building. I'm sure there are those that would argue that, but that's my opinion and I will stick With it. I will say that ff I had to rule on the mat- ter, I would say the separation of church and state law that I believe is a forest anyway, was broken. IRONICALLY, the Supreme Court will hear arguments soon in the case concerning the constitutional- ity of the Pledge of Allegiance. They will be charged with making a decision if the words, "One Nation under God" should be removed from the pledge. It's really funny to me that when they gather, they will open the session with the same words that have opened such sessions for hundreds of years.... "God save the United States and this Honorable Court." It is believed that those words were first uttered by Richard Wenman, the first Supreme Court crier back in 1790. So, is the Supreme Court affirming the establishment of religion when those words are said? I guess an argument could be put up either way on the matter. One may "yes" because they are making the appearance that faith is being placed in God to help with the decision making process. Others might argue that it is not. If we attempted to debate the issue, we would never resolve it. I read a letter in the COlumbus Ledger Enquirer over the weekend written by a man that stated he was a Christian minster and he felt the words should be removed from the pledge, noting thatit violates the separation of church and state. So, you can see what I mean by this being a topic that could be debated for sometime without resolve. THE TRUTH of the mat- ter is, everyone has their own opinion as to what the law real- ly means. Here again, my per- sonal opinion is I don't care. Here's what I have to say on the subject. I don't care where Moore was right or wrong in what he did; I don't care about separa- tion of church and state; and above all, I don't care who knows it. I for one believe there is a God. I believe that I owe him my life, soul and my praise. I don't care what others believe. As far as I'm concerned, separation of church and state is a forest. It is an argument that can not be won and will never be resolved and I wofft get caught up in it.. For me, I will pray when and where I please, I will recite the words "One nation under God" in my pledge, and I will do it without worrying about it. So far as I know, my fore- fathers fought to make us free in this country and the word free means just that. I'm free to live as I choose, not as other tells me. SO, I'll continue to live by the Ten Commandments and curse those that do not and I'll still pray that God .has mercy on this nation and all those that choose to live here, even if I don't agree with them. 1"111 ||OGANSVII.LE HOME NEws is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Conlpany, a dk ision or'Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway. Manchester, Georgia 31816, USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $20 in Troup. tlarris or Meriwether Counties; $24 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales ta'e,. Periodical tstage paid at Hogansville. Georgia 30230.Single copy 50. FOR st scmtntors call (7061 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager. Star lerc'm 3 Publicalions. E O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. PosrM,srEm Send address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansville. GA 30230, STVF Publisher and [-itor ............................................................................ John Kukycndall Adxerlising Directr. ................................................................................. Laurie Lewis Ass:iate Editor ................................................................................... Clint Claylok Busines,, Manager. ........................................................................... ,..Jayne GoMston Assistant Editor. .................................................................................... Rob Richardson Slafl Writers .......................................................................... Bryan Geler, Billy Bryant C onqx,sing .................. : ......................................... Dewayne Flowers, Robert Weems l .egal ..................................................................................................... Jayne Goldston Civulalion Manager. .......................... : ................................... Barbara Arlene Steennan Press Manager. ................................................................................ Wayne Grochowski Pressn)m Assistants ...................... Lany Colleges. Zaddie Dixon.Darnell McCauley Madruml Distribution ............................................................................... l)avid Boggs CORPORATE OFFICERS [[  !t[ nl ............................................................................................. Mtllard B. Gnmes ICC t leMdC 1| .................................................................................. Charlo{ S. Gr mes kecutive Vice President and Secretary ........................................ Laura Grimes Cofer heasuiel ....................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garrett l,egal Couusel and Assistant Secretary ............................................... James S. Grimes PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - Nov. 20, 2003 A Nice Few Days With the From Lewis Grizzard's collection "Won't You Come ltome Billy Bob Bailey?" Written in 1978 I am the only person in my family ever to have spent a weekend at The Cloister on Sea Island, or anywhere like it. However, my Uncle Gaylord once spend a week- end in Tulsa, where he fin- ished second in a pool tour- nament and met his fourth wife, who was performing on the tables in the motel lounge. Uncle Gaylord always knew how to live. Sea Island, Ga. Soon I will be checking out of The CloisteL a famous resort hotel for rich people. Soon, I will be penniless again. A weekend here costs four houses and a mortgage on Marvin Gardens. Harley Devonshire Billups III, the big butter and egg man from Shreveport, might have that kind of stash, but I was hop- ing somebody would put me on scholarship before settle- up time came at the cashier's window in the lobby This place is so spiffy, you have to wear a tuxedo for ten- nis. The Cloister, people always say, is full of "old world charm." That means that if you don't own at least one European country, you'll choke when you see your bill. The bigs come here. Corporation presidents, heads of state, politicians who haven't been caught yet, and wealthy baseball players like Pete Rose, would come, if they had any class. All weekend I have felt like a leisure suit at the club's spring formal. What if the other guests, I kept asking myself, discover a charlatan has slipped into their midst? I took extra precautions, like wearing dark socks and parking the truck off the island, but rich people can usually sniff out a taxpayer. We fold our wallets inside out. ONE FELLOW almost caught me over drinks in one of the club rooms. He was from New York and several other places. I think he owned Canada or something. ,"What's you game old chap?" he asked me. "Newspaper," I said. "Buying or selling?" he persisted. I took a long sip from my drink, a Rednecker. That's an amaretto straight-up with a long-neck bud chaser. "Buying," I said, which isn't a total lie. When I can't rip off my daffy copy from the boss' office, I have to pop for a quarter and go to the rack like everyone else. There is a lot to do at The Cloister, located on the opu- lent Golden Isles of Georgia and a million miles from the' back room of Harold's Barbecue of Atlanta, one of my other favorite vacation spots. You can go for a walk on the beach, or play tennis, golf, croquet, lawn bowls, shuffle- board and bridge. You can shoot skeet at the gun club, go horseback riding, take dancing lessons or drink afternoon tea with the older folk. It is true that a lot of older people do visit here. In face, the line on The Cloister goes, it's the sport for "newlyweds and nearly-deads." Often, young couples honeymoon here who fit both categories after a week of bundling in their ocean-front bungalows. ONE of the older people I met here was delightful man they call "The Colonel." The Colonel is a West Pointer, class of '15. Eisenhower was one of his classmates. He is looking forward to his next reunion. "Only 19 of us left. now," said the Colonel as he gunned down a final prune juice and left for his dancing lesson. THE REASON I did this - took a room at The Cloister for the weekend - is deserved it. The rigors work have been, heap I drive blew a the moths ate another hole my sports coat and I left favorite Willie on a window ledge the morning and the it, which is why Willie like Kate Smith with a et over her head. So I came here to from it all. I had patio fast overlooking the Atlantic. One morning I ordered Kadota figs from South Kadota. I in graceful elegance, tennis and rubbed and elbows With the landed try, and dozed in the sun the Colonel. It's like they say beer commercials, "You go around once..." so the cucumber aspic you Besides, next week I eat the soap I stole off maid's cleaning car BY SPECIAL HIS WIDOW, DEDRA, HOME NEWS IS CARRYING El) COLUMNS BY THE GRIZZARD, BY MORELAND, AND MOST WIDELY READ WRITER OF HIS BOOKS PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 AND WIDE. The Story of a Brave Young Today, I want to share with you an article from almost two and a half years ago. It is about a young man anhisoUgg he faced a dreaded di,ease. This is a story about a young man who is a member of our church, who the Lord took home this past Sunday. I want to share this arti- cle again because I want us to be reminded of the courage and faith of Michael Bailey. Don't think for a minute that Michael lost his battle with MD, but know that he was faithful to the task that God gave him, he finished his work, now he is at home with his Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. As I sit and write this lit- tle article, it is Monday, April 23. Actually, I am late in writ- ing and I hope this makes the paper in time. You see, this morning and most of the afternoon was spent at Eggelston Children's Hospital in Atlanta. A young man, who is a member of our church, has been there going on three weeks and that after spend- ing a couple of weeks in West Georgia Medical Center in LaGrange. By now I guess most of you who are familiar with our church know that I am refer- ring to Michael Bailey. Michael, up until today, has spent every one of those hos- pital days with a breathing tube down his throat. But today, Michael had the tube removed from his throat and a "track" surgically implant- ed. I write today about Michael for a couple of rea- sons. First of alLI write because many of you tell us that you read these articles and enjoy them. For that I am very greatfull and hope these lines will continue to be a blessing to you. But this week, I am writing asking you for a favor. For those of you who believe in prayer and really pray, I ask you to pray for Michael and his family. Michael has MD, which is the ultimate underlying cause for this surgery. THE SURGERY went well, and Lord willing, Michael will be coming home after some close observation and training for Michael's family on how to care for him Many of you that see me ,around town ask about Michael and send your prayers and best wishes to him and his family. All the family appreciates your con- cern and still covets your prayers. Not only am I requesting prayer for Michael, but I want to share with you a little about a brave young man. For sev- eral weeks now, Michael has- n't had anything to eat or drink by mouth, nor has he been able to speak. As a pastor, I guess one of the reasons Ihave gone to see Michael and his family was to be an encouragement to them. But, I must be honest with you, I am not sure how much encouragement I have been, but I want to tell you what an encouragement Michael and his family have been to me. Many times when adverse circumstances come our way, we are often quick to murmur, complain and generally become discour- aged. But, during all these weeks of ups and downs, the times of taking a step forward and then sliding two steps back, I have yet to hear one word of complaint from Michael or his family. Sure, they have faced times of uncertainty and problems, but there has always been that underlying trust in the Lord. SOMETHING that hap- pened today while Michael was being rolled to the oper- ating room is, I guess, the one thing that really spoke to my heart. Ever since he has been in Atlanta, Michael has been in the same room, staring at the same walls and listening to all the beeps and hisses that are characteristic of an Intensive Care Unit. But, as Michael was being carried to the operating room, there wasn't a look of fear" or dread on Michael's Michael was all smiles, taking in all the signs sounds of different saw. I wonder teul we are for the we take for granted day. The opportunity to the spring flowers, feel breeze and soak warmth of the sun. being there for today Michael was me. Allow me to share more thing that Michael that ought to be such encouragement and lenge to each of us. ago, just before leaving room, I prayed Michael, in intensive breathing tube down throat, nothin in weeks, and not having looked up square in my and just as plain as mouthed a great big, you." Talking about your heart, that did. if those of us who breath drink and enjoy the sun as greatful as that? may all our hearts be lenged to be truly and appreciative for things we enjoy everyday. closing, may I sa it is we who ought to you, and especially the for allowing you to be a of our lives. 50 Years Ago... QUITE A CATCH - The front page of the Nov. 19, 1953 Hogansville Herald carried a photo and caption of J.C. Thomas' seven-pound.bass caught at a private lake. "A bass fisherman of the old school, he was very modest and calm about his catch." Quite logically, it men- tioned that he "only phoned his fishing. friends who had telephones." GOOD OLD PRICES OF THE 1950S - The Sandwich Shop advertised its special, a full Thanksgiving meal with beverage and dessert, for $1.25. ,,SO WHAT'S WRONG WITH THE '54 MODELS? ' A blurb inside the news- paper noted that "A pretty girl in a 1953 bathing suit is something to see." In the Hogansville Herald Predeceuor to the Hogansvllle Home New , =CINEMA - Westerns were still money -makers at Hogansville's Royal Theatre. Among the films showing that week were "Black Hills Ambush" and q'he Stand at Apache River." But other selec = tions included ."Terror on a Train" and Bing Crosby in "Little Boy Lost." *POPULAR IN STORES, TOO " Cowboy-themed clothes at Belk-Gallant included Dale Evans and Roy Rogers house shoes for $1.98 and Hickok belts for $1.50-$3." *FROM THE CLASSIFIEDS: "Wanted: Man or woman to succeed dealer closing up in Hogansville. No expe- rience necessary. Good profits for huS" t/ers."