"
Newspaper Archive of
The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
Lyft
November 25, 1999     The Hogansville Herald
PAGE 4     (4 of 10 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 4     (4 of 10 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
November 25, 1999
 

Newspaper Archive of The Hogansville Herald produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




OPINION I THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS :i  A Gr Publication MillMd B. Gdmeo, President USPS 62O-O4O MInE HAU PUBIJSHFa/ADVERTISING DIRECTOR JOHN KAUL ASSOCIATE PUBI,ISHER/F_ITOR MAroON (TED) Sm MANAGING EDITOCAL Du_roR JANE GOLDSTON BUSIN E&S 1V[ANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 R O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 ( ud Legal O,gmL ('iiv qf ttogtu..ville To My Mother... :::::: ::?:: ?:i ' : . My wife asked me why I was ........ following her around inthe kitchen, Actually, I was trying to figure out , :/::::.: a way to help her. She then asked ;C . if I did this to my mother when I was little. Before I could answer could count on saving about thir- the fast question I was thinking W minutes every fime she tcok me about the second one. The first shopping. question never got answered, for Even though she dkin always when I told her I did, in fact, fol- welcome my maldng comments at low my mother around in the the grocery store, Mother was my kitchen when I was small, she then constant protector. There were asked me if I held on to her dress, times when I actually did some How does my wife know these things that were wrong. I broke a things? The woman is psychic! lot of stuff; oh, by accident, of I was probably way too young course. Then there were report to rememher when I started hook- cards, too. We won't go there. Did ing on to my mother's print dress I tell you that I eventually was and getting towed around the accepted to and graduated from ldtchen. The only thing I can think college? So, you know tlx early of that would give me some indi- report cards weren't that bad; cation of how she felt was when either way, my dad was from the Herman, my dog, bit the seat of old school that says you always pay my pants and wouldn't let go. I the price. That payment always dragged him around from room to somehow involved pain. FAtherit room with that grip steadily was the palm of his hand, which damped downtm the denim. It was he ffmally fgured out probably hurt aggravating to say the least, and him as much as it did me, or his the dog was heavy for such a small belt, which didn hurt him at all I compact package. Mother, no hated that belt, and the wait for doubt, had the same ts about him to come home and spank nm me, even though I helped her by withit was like being tm death row walkingandnotheingdraggedlike with no more appeals. Mother Herman. would teal me that if I behaved and I usually did my following didn't commit whatever ungodly around when it was raining or too atrocity I did, again,  she would cold to go outside. Our house on tell Dad that I didn mean to do it Marshall Avenue Was quite small That wouldn't prevent the and there were only a couple of inevitable spanking, but it would :: rotmmthtwmallowed toplay' redu the nuiaber of licks. I am in.I could opay go in the kitchen forever indebted to my mother fta" - when mmamel was there. Our that because my rear has never living room was not for people been padded well not eves today. either. We kept furniture in there The final act for which I but Mother didn allow anyone to remember my mother protecting go in. So, when Preacher Webb me Occurred when I was in high came to visit and she and Dad took school. This time it really was an him in the living room I asked him accident. I managed to lose a hub- ifhe was a realpers0n because real cap off my dad's '610mvz It was people weren allowed in our liv- one of the expemive ones Impalas hag room. I'm not sure he under- have, and I gave Mother all the stood.Thewereafewfimeswhen details. She offered to help me find no one was looking that I'd slip in another hubcap before Dad got there, and to this day I don see home from work We spent thebeS- anything so special about it When ter half of the day in and out of we moved up on North Highway junkyards and S'Lfl.g through all the same furniture went into our kinds of things. Mother was good new living room, but then I was at looking through stuff; she had allowed to go in anytime I wante& plenty of practice at J.C. Penney It wasn nearly as much fun as it in LaGrange. When I was about was when it was offlimit five or six rd hang tm to he" dresa I always went with Mother to and get pulled through numerous the Colonial Stm, I guess because racks of clothes. But, that's anoth- she didn't trust me at home by er'ullingstory."Wefinallyfound myself; Smig_ht go into the living the matching hubcap and I used room. I didn mind going to the my allowance to make the pur. grocery store because I liked to chase. We picked Dad up from "see my neighbor, Tommy Whaley, work and he never knew he had working the cash register. He was been short one hubcap for most of pretty friendly and I liked his dog, the day. I was too big for a spank- Spot. I didn care for all those ing by then, but his "hard talks" pigeons he raised under b.is moth- were just as painful er's house. They were pretty nasty So, you see I owe a lot to my birds and made too much noise. At mother, and if I hadn't started fol - least that's what Mother always lowingheraroundthatkitchmtug- sai&Iwasprettygeedaboutadding ging on her dress she may never conunentstotheconversationwith have noticed I was there; and my our neighbors, whom she ran into rearend, nottomentionotherparts, at the grocery store. It got me may have scars to this day. So, popped a time or two. Here is one Mother, ff I haven't told you late- good thing about Mother carrying ly, or tugged tm your print dress in me along, it tended to get the bull a while, I want to take this oppor- sessions over with quickly. She trinity to say, "I love yOtL" THE HOGANSVlLLEHOME NEWSis published weekly by the Star-Mercury PuMiahiag Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Masc--, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Sub.nption rates by mail: $15 in Metiwether, Talbot or Harris Counties; $20 a year elsewhere Prices include all sales taxes. Second class postage paid at Hogansville, Georgm 30230, FoR suascmertoNs call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester. C,trgia 31816. POS'1MASlXR: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansviile, GA 30230. STAFF Publisher and Advemsing Director .................................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ................................................................ John Kuykendall Business Manager ......................................................................................... Jane Goldattm Associate Editors .......................... Billy Bryanlfralbotton, Michael Snide#Hams Couaty Bryan Geter/Hogansville, Caroline Yeager/GreenviUe, Lee N. Howell Staff Writ ......................................................................................................... J. Den Stout Assistant Advertising Manager ........................................................................ Laurie t,Ks Advemsing Sales .............................................................................................. Limla Phoograph ................................................................................................... Mk:h Sait ................................................................................... Valinda lvery, Doff Cmma Legals .................................................. ............................................................... Vrmda lve RvcelXionist and Classifieds .............................................................................. Cl Youag Pressroom .............................................. Roland Folds, David Boggs, Wayne COm'ORATE OVCER President ......................................................................................................... Millard C_mnt Vkz nt ........................................................................................ Charlotm S. ............................................................................................... Laura Caim Ca= Tmamret .............................................................................................. Kathy CMm Catmm Lvgal Comi and Assistant Secretary .................................................... James S. Gtia PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - NOVEMBER 24, 1999 Another Thanksgiving Come and Gone Well now, Thanksgiving has come and gone for another year. We had, and have, so much to be thankful for Sometime try listing every- thing you are thankful for and the list anything you are not thankful for. I believe the "thankful for" list will be so much longer than the "not thankful" list there will be no comparison. One thing that made me feel real good was Antioch Church send around baskets of fruit. I don't know why we got one, but we love it. Thanks Antioch - you are a great Church- (even with- out the fruit basket)! Now don't ask any turkey (real that is) to make a list. Turkeys have a rough row to hoe at Thanksgiving.Sort of reminds me of the story of the prodigal son. You remember the father put the big pit in the little one and they are and were merry, all except the fatted calf who was reported to have said, "she wished the prodigal had stayed where he was and fed pigs." Had a nice invitation from Aunt Suzy in Alabama, but we were afraid to go. I was afraid the mud hole between here and Montgomery had opened up again and I could just hear the wife directing a few choice words in my direction as we watched the tail end of two mules as they dragged us for- ward, sitting in our new car (us - not the mules). Aunt Suzy and Uncle Jim Bob really do put on a do. Uncle Jim had shot a wild turkey. Now a wild turkey is mostly feath- ers, skin and bones. After cleaning you can see through most wild turkeys, but Aunt Suzy always knows what to do, so she stuffs the wild turkey with nice, fat possums. She bastes it in elderberry juice and prays for the best. Everything turned out well. A friend had brought a big bag of mountain oysters and that topped off the meal. Everyone had a great time and a few were even able to go home the next day. Let me ask you something. Are you afraid of (money) banks? Well I was, and perhaps still am. Some people, like I was, walk into a bank like they were going into the funeral home to pay last respects to some dear departed. Our lovely bank has a front and back door, and maybe some I haven't tried yet. Did you ever hear someone coming in the front door to yell to some- one coming in the back door in a loud voice, "Hey Steve, did- n't the Falcons smell yester- day? I can smell them yet! Sniff! Sniff!" No, you see a friend and whisper in a very low whisper, "How is your Aunt Maude?" "Oh," he whispers, "she died two years ago come January." I wipe my eyes and whisper, "I wish I had known." I go into the back door and glance in Jim's or John's office, wanting to make sure they are not in the Bahamas or Sweden, or somewhere. They have a book out; both carefully exam- ining it. "O, my gosh! I think that is my record and I've put the decimal point too far to the right." I want to run but I don't know where the Bahamas or Sweden might be. Then they glance up and give me a weak sickly smile so I am reassured that it is not my decimal. At least for now. Then it's to the Tellers and they always cheer me up, smil- ing and saying I look so good. They are fine, beautiful girls. They take my few pence like it was something great to save the bank. They take my money and I leave glancing in on Jim and John to see if they are still there. Seriously, there are friend- ly faces around "The Citizens Bank." The friendly voice of Fannie Mac Cannon, and old friend, after you drive away after cashing a check that may leave you $11.80 in the red or perhaps the other way around, "have a good day". It's a cheer- ful sound and always makes you want to come back. After all, who can go to the Bahamas on $11.80. RIGHT ACROSS from us on Mountville Road live our dear friends and Christine and Howard Now right in front of house they have the bil turnip patch I've ever really is a thing of beauty they did it without a mule! I think it's worth' to drive out to see it, and might get a mess of turnips. Turnip greens good, but it takes some to put meat on your I haven't records, but I believe biggest turnip patch yet - no mule. WE HAD A SPECIAL yesterday (Sunday) Mary Rosser (Miss Mary is official Valentine Hogansville. She was Valentine Queen several ago and since n't been held since, she is the reigning Queen): We got to screaming at another (she is a little being 91 years old and I'm fie deaf because I just n't listen when people were l ing to tell me something). We admired the patch and got to screaming ! good they were with bread. We meant real ljn' bread where the grease 6ze out and run down chin, not the dried up stuff get was a great pleasure to Mis: and to think again bread and turnip greens. Roosevelt Buys a Pair oJ Mules. (Another in a series) Otis Moore may have been hired as a cattle foreman origi- nally, but he was a sawmill man at heart. Moore's habits with cat- fie were sometimes unorthodox. peach and apple ohs: 0e at a press conference in Warm Springs, after he became President, Roosevelt replied to a question about this practice by saying that his cattle "can live up there [on the mountain- top orchard land] but I cannot fatten them, and as long as I do not, I cannot get a decent price." Rex Tugweli was sitting in on the conference. He asked why the President didn't let them "get their growth up there and then bring them down and fatten them?" Roosevelt said that would work if he revamped the farm arrangement. Apparently some such revamp- ing was done and the cattle spent more time in pasture thereafter. Occasionally, Roosevelt's cattle were an embarrassment. Ia 1938 a Meriwether County farmer's wife wrote Roosevelt that the cattle had been "turned out...to make their living or die and I lust say I have sure had a time with those cows. They have torn up all the shrubbery that I had. These cows almost drive us crazy." This in a neatly typed letter. There apparently was no reply. In 1940 another of his neigh- boring farmers wrote Roosevelt to complain that his cows had eaten some velvet beans on his farm. The letter was written on ,two sheets of 4 by 7 lined soft paper, the kind used in schools of the day. It was addressed "Mr. Franklin D. Roosevelt, Washington, D.C." and began "Dear Sir...I am sorrow that I halft to write gou aboBt.it. But Mr. Moore haven't paidmeTet. And I need::th nev:ito buy some feed for my cow...Yours very truly..." Missy LeHand referred the letter to the Georgia Warm Springs Foundation, which paid the farmer $4. ROOSEVELT RELENTED on tree-cutting in 1935. He agreed to the cutting down of 200 "obviously mature" trees on the foundation's grounds to be sold to a federal agency then in the market for lumber. Otis Moore and some of his hands did the logging, and the sawing was done on the farm in part- nership with a local lumber company. The 1935 enterprise worked out well. They sold over $700 worth of lumber. So Moore and his hands then cut enough trees on Miss Georgia Wilkins's prop- erty adjoining Roosevelt's Little White House to earn $1,000 for the good lumber, then traded the scrap for a feed mill for the cattle. "Didn't have to pay out any cash at all," a proud Moore wrote the President. He had similar success in 1936 and 1937. He began pressing for permis- sion to buy "a small outfit and operate it ourselves." That finally came about in 1938. Right away, the operation cost Roosevelt money, since the first sawing produced lumber there was no market for. The President had to advance Moore $500 to keep the crew together until conditions changed. OTIS MOORE'S place in the history of Roosevelt Farms is connected not only to the sawmill and cattle, but also to mules. After 1933, there were a number of stories in the press to the effect that Roosevelt owned the Georgia farm, but knew nothing about farming and left the decision making to hired men. Roosevelt and his White House aides allowed sto- ries about the success and prof- itability of the farm to go unchal- lenged (except when asked directly, as for instance, when a Baltimore-published farm magazine inquired if the farm was truly a model in the profit- making sense; Roosevelt direct- ed his press secretary to tell the editor that the farm did not make a profit, though he hoped some day it would). But they did not like the sort of stories that said Roosevelt was a bad farmer. Moore read the stories and was troubled by them, too. He was also troubled by a visit from Things to be Thankful jb00r... Yes, we can be thankful because we live in a beautiful area, have the freedom and health to enjoy it, a job that allows us to enjoy it and good food to sustain us. That is an awful lot to be thankful for, and a lot ofpeople we owe our thanks as weu. While I'm thankful for all this, there's much more I should be thankful for. I have a won- derful family who is healthy and happy. I have a grandson who has opportunities today much greater than myself or even his Prularents did at that age and I'm y thankful for that as well. Life has treated me pretty good this past year. Like most Americans, I have more pos- sessions than I need and live comfortable even though I'm not wealthy. While I may not have all my needs are provided for. I have clothes to wear, food to eat and a roof over my head. for that. America has an abundant food supply and we all enjoy and partake of it. We will be remind- ed of this when we sit down to eat our Thanksgiving dinner this week. In our state, agricul- ture is one of the largest employ- ers and our farmers make up approximately $65 billion of Georgia's $353 billion output. Georgia leads the nation in pro- ducing broilers, pecans, peanuts and softwood fiber. We have our farmers to thank for that. We live in one of the most beautiful areas in the state. For that we can thank our elderly citizens for maintaining the beauty we enoy here today. In our natron, we are among the healthiest people in the world. For that we can thank our researchers, doctors and every other member of the med- ical field. Americans have so much to be thankful for. This week, we will take time to give thanks for all that we have and enjoy. Something we should do each and every day. In this great nation of ours, we can be thankful for a won- derful life with freedom. While we all complain about paying taxes and other inconvemences, we do have our freedom and we can thank those who have served and are serving in our military/or it. Their sacrifices provided us with the freedoms we enjoy today. Most of us have a good job, a nice home and car and all the other possessions we deire. While we earn our living by hard work good health and our indi- vidual abilities and talents, we must remind ourselves we are among the most educated peo- ple in the world mid we can thank our schools and teachers 000 a reporter whose showed skepticism Roosevelt's farming edge. So he suggested Roosevelt that President--demonstrate he in control ,by purchasing mules the farin needed. When the President down for his Thanksgiving son vacation in 1934, a dealer brought a to the farm. FDR, with the drove ! House. A deal was made the President displayed edge about mules. Walter Trohan, the Tribune Washington dent, suggested the the new mules, Hop and after Roosevelt's Harry Hopkins and Tugwell, who were also that day. The names stuck. Good publieity resulted there was an result. A Lakewood, Ohio wrote this note Associated Press dispatch described the trade-in 'old, wornout mules': ly ask for information as ages and condition of mules. If the transaction attached article indicates our opinion you should ally reconsider the case general good of both and the animals. Don A. Cooper." on West Georgia farms) By John Kuykendall Associate Publisher Without the good health tion and abilities I afford those things would most likely be thanks to my hiring me and with a job. Yes, we as Americans a good life and we often to thank those who have it possible. Unfortunately, seem to always forget to the credit where credit is For all we have to be for comes from This Th//nksgiving, give the Lord the deserves. It is because we can enjoy the live giving breath he us, we wouldn't be any of these things. Happy Thanks everyone, I hope vided you with much to thankful for this year.