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November 30, 2000     The Hogansville Herald
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Opinions & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVII_LE HOME NEWS - NOVEMBER 30, 2000 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS usPs 620-o40 A (rs J.blication Millard B. Grimes, President MIKE I'IAI PUBLISHER]ADVERTISING D1RECrOR JOHN KUYKENDALL ASSOCIATE PUBIJSW.R/EDn'OR BRYAN GETER ASSOCIATE EDITOR JAYNE GOLDSTON BUSINESS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 E O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 # Bulldogs' Program Has Identity Crisis? I am really proud to be a Georgia Southern Golden Eagle fan. Year after year, they man- age to win. I'm also proud to be a Georgia Bulldog fan, but I'm a bit upset with the program right now. I've been a Georgia fan for as long as I can remember. There have been good years and bad years, but lately the Bulldogs appear to be having an identity crisis. At some times during the season the Bulldogs looked like a contender, then they would sud- denly look like the whipping boys on the corner. Last week against Georgia Tech, they looked like the whipping boys on the corner. I told my son on Thursday the Bulldogs would be handed a good old-fashioned attitude adjust- ment by the Yellow Jackets and it happened. At one point, I almost started cheering for Georgia Tech just to get the fiasco over with. "Just keep on pounding away," I shouted as ff the Yellow Jackets or the Bulldogs could hear me. Adjustments have not been a strong point for the Georgia coaching tfj[lir season. ,The : Bulldog de'feffse fdrthe most p has looked pretty good all season, that is, until they met the Yellow Jackets. The offense has looked weak all season and they looked even weaker against the Yellow Jackets. ESPN quoted Vince Dooley a few weeks ago as saying the pro- gram was not looking for a head coach because Jim Dorman had posted consistent winning sea- sons That's great, but the Podunk Bowl doesn't look good to me. This is the second season in a row that the Bulldogs have lost three of their last four games and finished at 7-4. Donnan now falls to 2-3 against Georgia Tech. News flash.. Georgia fans won't accept that very long. OK, we all know Georgia had some injuries this past season, but so did Tech. When the Yellow Jackets lost quarterback Joe Hamilton everyone said their sea- son was in jeopardy, but the Jackets answered the call. As a matter of fact, Jacket quarter- back George Godsey had 222 yards passing against the Dawgs. While injuries play a key role, Offer a solution... Praise someone... Share an idea... Get R off your chest.., so does coaching and motivation. It appears to me, at least in the past couple of years, the Georgia Bulldogs have lacked the killer instinct. Motivation has little to do with talent, but a great deal to do with coaching. GEORGIA FANS might want to consider becoming a Georgia Southern Golden Eagle fan. Although they suffer injuries just like everyone else, they always find a way to have a winning sea- son, they are a sistent playoff contender and they have pretty good coaching. For instance, the Eagles were trailing McNeese State by a score of 17-14 at the end of the half in the first-round of the playoffs Saturday, but they turned it up a notch in the second half to take a 42-17 win. That is not only the mark of a champion, but a coaching staff that can make adjustments. LET'S FACE IT, in Georgia we are not blessed with many good teams. We have the Falcons who have made the Super Bowl once, but since have not managed a win- ning season and are at the bottom of the NFL right now with a great 3-10 record, We have the Hawks, who almost never make the play- offs and so far this season have been able to win two games. We are blessed with the Braves, who dominated profes- sional baseball during the '90s. The question is, does it take good coaching or great talent to win? The answer is, it takes both. Think I'm wrong? Tell the South Carolina Gamecocks and Lou Holtz that. We gladly welcome letters to the editor! Those Mysterious Classified I was glancing through the paper the other day and I came across the personal ads in the clas- sified section. Ever read those ads? They're much more interesting than read- ing the soybean futures on the financial pages, and I lost inter- est in Dick Tracy years ago. One ad read, "GWM wants to meet GWM for travel and inti- mate relationship. Must be non- smoker." After some thinking (I'm also. brilliant on the Jumble word game, having gotten "UTIGRA" -- guitar -- in 15 seconds), I fig- ured out what the capital letters in the ads stood for. "GWM," of course, is a "gay white male," and I'm thinking here's this gay guy who wants to travel and become intimate with another gay guy and he's got to know the facts about AIDS, but what he's concerned about is breathing secondhand smoke from his lover's cigarette. Another ad read, "SWF wants SWM who's into jazz, the classics, vintage wines, and hiking." "SWF" and "SWM," I figure, has to stand for "single white female" and "single white male." "Straight" is possible, too, but let's not get overly immersed in detail, and just who does this SWF think she's kidding here? Any single white female who has to resort to taking out an ad to find a boyfriend would take a SWM who's into yodeling, Hustler magazine, Ripple, and robbing convenience stores. Still another ad read: "SBM, handsome, athletic, financially secure, wants SBF, 20s, who will be his princess." If I were a SBF (single black female) I would want to know how this narcissist got his money, and if being his princess meant I'd have to be tied up or do anything involving animals. I don't think I'd ever put an ad in the personal section, but if I ever did resort to such a thing, : I'm afraid I'd have a difficult time getting all I wanted to say about myself in a few capital letters. I'm a "DWM," a divorced white male (okay, an oft-SWM). On top of that I'm a "MAODWM," a "Middle-aged-often divorced- white-male," and I don't smoke, which makes me a "MAOD- WMNS." I'd also like for prospective companions to know I'm a Protestant, a college graduate, a If my social life desperate point, I can after the "SWHWs." Single Waffle House resses. They're around ada wiches in town. BY SPECIAL WITH HIS DEDRA, J "...I'm afraid I'd have a difficult time getting all I wanted to say about myself in a few capital letters." 14 handicap golfer, and I snore, which now has me up to being a "MAODWMNSPCG 14HGWS." Naturally, I'd also want to point out I'm a dog lover who brushes his teeth regularly, still has his hair, loves egg sandwich- es, and often entertains friends by doing a simply marvelous El) COLUMNS BY THE GRIZZARD WHO GREW L NEARBY GEORGIA WRITER OF HIS GRIZZARD BELONGED TO BELONGED TO THIS AREA OF WHICH HE SooFrEN OF 1-85 FROM NEWNAN HOGANSVILLE IS NAMED I/q: HONOR. THE LEWIS MUSEUM WAS MORELAND IN 1996, ING AND EDITING LAB IS DEDICATED TO HIS MEMORY HIS BELOVED TAPF2 SALE THROUGH BAD impression of FDR declaring war .PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX on the Japanese in 1941. ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 Now, how are you going to get BOOK AND MUSIC all that in a classified ad? NATIONWIDE. Georgia Race Was Preview for U.S. (Editor's note: Georgia once found itself in a dilemma simi- lar to that now facing the nation. The General Election of 1966 failed to produce a clear-cut winner for governor. Republican candidate Howard (Bo) Callaway of Harris County led Democrat Lester Maddox in popular votes by more than 3,000, but nearly 60,000 write- in votes for Ellis Arna pr- vented CalIaway from having h clear majority of all votes count- ed, then required in Georgia. As in the presidential election, there was no provision for a runoff in Georgia at that time, and the state constitution stip- ulated that the election be set- tled in the General Assembly. Callaway supporters car- ried a challenge to the consti- tutional provision all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, which ruled by one-vote - 5-4 - that the General Assembly should choose between the two front- runners. In mid-January, the heavily Democratic Assembly selected Maddox. In the following column, which first appeared in The Columbus Ledger-Enquirer on Nov. 20, 1966, Millard Grimes, then its editor, warned how the nation could end up with an indecisive presidential election under the Electoral College method of selection. Now, 35 years later, Grimes' warning seems rele- vant, although he foresaw a d4f- ferent type of dilemma. Grimes is now president and CEO of the Manchester Star-Mercury.) THE REST OF the nation may be chuckling over Georgia's no-governor dilem- ma, but it is entirely possible that the nation could end up in the same dilemma after the 1968 presidential election. And that would be no laughing matter for anyone. The U.S. Constitution pro- vides that in the event no can- didate for President receives a majority of the electoral votes, the selection of President will be made by the incoming House of Representatives. Courts have no jurisdiction over this provi- sion. Twice in U.S. history, the House has been called on to make the selection, in 1800 and in 1824. But in the more com- plicated world of today, uncer- tainty at the national level which corresponded to the pre- sent uncertainty in Georgia would have dangerous conse- quences. Even in 1800 and in 1824, the.. selection by Congress plunged the nation into tempo- rary crisis. THE 1800 ELECTION involved Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr. By a freak loophole in the electoral college, they had received the same number of electoral votes, although Jefferson was running for pres- ident and Burr was running for vice president. The loophole was corrected by the 12th amendment. Nevertheless, the 1800 choice went to the House, and Jefferson was selected only because his great antagonist, Alexander Hamilton, the Federalist leader, gave him his support. Hamilton stood against Jefferson's philosophy of gov- ernment, but he considered Burr an unprincipled scoundrel. This action by Hamilton eventually resulted in a pistol duel with Burr in which Hamilton was shot to death. Burr then became a hunted criminal, and even attempted to organize an armed revolt against the Washington govern- ment. IN 1824, four candidates split the electoral vote. Andrew Jackson led in the popular vote, but Henry Clay, who finished third, supported John Quincy Adams, the runnerup, and suc- ceeded in throwing the House election to Adams. There were no political par- ties as we know them at that time. Jackson never forgave Clay, and although the episode did not lead to a duel as in the case of Hamilton and Burr, it did result in Clay's founding of the Whig party to oppose Jackson. In !968, the nation could easily find itself in another cri- sis, with no candidate receiving a majority of electoral votes. Indeed, that is the stated goal Of Alabama's Gov. George Wallace, who proposes to run as a third party candidate, in hopes of capturing enough electoral votes to deny either the Democratic or Republican can- didate a clear majority. Can he do it? Obviously, the possibility exists. The outcome would depend on how close the mar- gin is between the two major contenders. LET'S SAY THAT Wallace received the most popular votes in just three states - Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana. That would give him 27 electoral votes, a modest total to be sure, but as large, percentagewise, as the 58,000 popular votes which Ellis Arnall,s write-in col- lected in Georgia. (Editor's note: Wallace actually carried five states, including but Richard Nixon won a majority of the votes.) If the contest betweeO Democratic nominee and Republican nominee was those 27 votes could either from getting the toral votes needed for a ity. Well, ,you sa would put Gov. strong bargaining position. But would it? The tution sends the choice to House of Re selection between the two candidates, and Gov. would be in l only if he controlled the gressmen of the states ried, which is an prospect. Most f these con men will be they'll have the choice ing for the Democratic dential nominee or for Republican nominee. If Republicans majority of House the Ret undoubtedly be selected. If the Democrats majority, the southern bers would probably hold deciding vote, but it's envision them deserting Democratic nominee no ter what their They've stuck by the every organizational vote, few congressmen or have strayed from the fold l presidential election. Wallace might point - as the Arnall movement did - but he also create a crisis of dence in the elective just as has happened in If he does run, and some electoral votes, the nation may look Georgia's predicament bit more understanding sympathy. THE HOCsvn.LE HOME Nmvs is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway. Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 6204340. Subscription rates by mail: $16 in Tronp, Heard or Meriwether Counties; $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230. FOR sugor call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Puhlk;ations, E O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to E O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30231). STAFF Publisher and Advertising Director ...........................................  ........................ Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ................................................................ John Kayken ,dall Associate Editor ............................................................ : ..................................... Bryan Geter Assistant Edilor .......................................................................................... .Rob Richardson Business Manager ........................................................................................ Jayne Goldston Staff Writers.....:. ................................................................ Michael C. Snider, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager ........................................................................ Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ............................................................................................. ....Lori Camp Aistant Editor ........................................................................................... Rob Richardson Composing ..................................................... Valinda Ivery, Deborah Smith, Lauren King Legals ................................. . .......................................................................... Jayne Goldston Receptionist and Classifieds .............................................................................. Cleta Young Production Manager .............................................................................................. Todd Laird Pressroom ............................. : .................................. David Boggs and Wayne Grochowski COaVOaATE Oncns President .................................................................................................... Millard B. Grimes Vice President ........................................................................................ Charlotte S. Grimes Secretary ................................................. .............................................. Laura Grimes Cofer Treasurer .............................................................................................. Kathy Grimes Garrett Let Us All Keep Christ in Christmas Someone has made the state- ment, "He who has not Christmas in his heart will never find it under a tree." The sea- son is definitely upon us. The turkeys that were stuffed have now stuffed us, the pies that were filled with apples now fill us and now our attention has been drawn to the festive Christmas season. During this time of year many things beg our time and attention. Things such as Christmas parties and dinners, Christmas plays and special services, family get- togethers and  company parties all call for some portion of our time. Just as it is easy for the child's eye to be turned to the bright lights and decorated trees, it is easy for adults to get sidetracked as well. As enjoy- able as the season is and the things that traditionally accom- pany it, if you do not have Christmas in your heart, it will not be found under a tree or in a beautifully wrapped package. My wife has a pin she wears during this time of year, maybe some of you have the same pin. It reads, "Jesus is the reason for the season." May we all realize the only way we can enjoy a sea- son as festive as this is solely because of Jesus. This world offers many substitutes for Jesus, but the bottom line is, there is no substitute. If it weren't for a babe wrapped in swaddling clothes, there would be no reason for beautifully wrapped packages. If there wasn't any suffering on the cross of Calvary, there could be no "Joy to the World." The point is, how can we leave Jesus out of Christmas since without: there could be no ( Although most scholars ably not the most for Christ's birth, I see wrong of setting aside honor the coming Kings to the earth. I could say as the song is the birthday of a is the time we birthday of Jesus, then why is it so out of his own can be no real Peace oo and Joy to the World Christ.