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Manchester, Georgia
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December 4, 2003     The Hogansville Herald
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December 4, 2003
 

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Opinions & Ideas PAGE 4A - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - DEC. 4, 2003 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620.040 JOHN KUYKENDALL PUBLISHER/EDITOR LAURm I.WIS ADVERTISING DIRECrOR CLrr CLAYnROOK ASSOCLTE EDITOR ROB RICHARDSON ASSISTANT EDITOR JAYNE GOLDSTON BUSINESS MANAGER A rtlnle llaoll phone (706) 846-3188- Fax (706) 846=2206 P. O. Box 426 Mmud B.   Hogansvine, Georgia 30230 It Was A Wonderful Thanksgiving Day Well, it's over for another year. Thanksgiving has come and gone, and if you're like me, you ate more turkey than you care to think about. Unfortunately, you probably have plenty left to eat as well. I hope each and everyone had a great Thanksgiving, My was wonderful. I manag,d to get awiy for a few days d spend time with my grand- son, Eli, iatI had not seen' in a while. All of the family w- n't togetlldr fhough. Sinc my son, Brannon married, he usually eds time withhis in-lawson giving. I did manage. :g.ye him a call though h hirn and his lovely .('wifd'  a hapby Thanksgig: . ' Family,"f0od and fti;are what make' ' Thanksgiviilg such a great holiday. Especially spending time with family. As I spend this Thanksgiving with Eli, I remembered last year and the year before and so on. It's funny how much the family has changed in the past five years since he was born. It's amazing how a child can bring so much joy, happiness and togetherness to a family. AS I WAS reminiscing, I ,thought about gving days of my childhood and one in particular. Not long after I was mar- ried, my mother was diag- nosed with cancer of the esophagus. If you've never had to deal with such a trag- ic disease, you could never begin to understand how much it affects a person and their way of life. My mother's last Thanksgiving wts one I'll never forget. I had watched her deteriorate drastically in a period of two years after being diagnosed. By that last Thanksgiving, she couldn't even eat. Everything would choke her and it was hard on both of us. My wife, Bev, tried to make a Thanksgiving dinner that year she could enjoy and we had plenty of things like mashed potatoes and other soft foods that she could eat as well. I watched my mother struggle through that dinner and can remember it to this day. When it was over and my sister's family had left, my mother and I sat down and had a chat. I think that was the first time we had ever talked about the inevitable end we both knew was com- ing. We chatted about the din- ner and family for a little while and then I said some- thing to the effect of how sorry I was that she couldn't enjoy Thanksgiving dinner as in year's past. I'll never forget the expression on her face and the words that followed. "I did enjoy Thanksgiving dinner," she replied. "More than you will ever know. While I couldn't enjoy the food as much as I once did, it was great to be with my fam- ily. I don't know how many more Thanksgiving days I'll enjoy, but none of them could be any better than this one. "Having the family here meant more to me than any- thing," she said. AFTER THAT conversa- tion, I always wondered ff my mother was just saying that to make me feel better. It was not until this Thanksgiving day that I understood what she was saying. I didn't have all my fm- fly together on ThanksgivL-ig, as I said, Brannon spent time with his in-laws. However, I had most of my family togeth- er and we all had a wonder- ful time. There is nothing more important in the world than family, and while I guess I've always realized that, for some reason lately, I've thought about it even more. My mother used to always tell me,' when my children were young .... "Enjoy them now, because when they get older they will always be on you mind and in your heart." Another thing I understand more clearly today. My children and grand- children mean the world to me. All you have to do is visit my desk at the office to see that. There are photographs of them everywhere. They are truly always thought of by me. So, now I have more mem- ories to add to my long col- lection and I hope that you and your family made some memories this Thanksgiving as well. Trust me, I've learned from experience, and the teachings of my mother, that life is too short and that fam- ily is the most important thing we each possess. Now, I'm ready to begin making Christmas memo- ries. THE HOGANSViLLE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester. Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $20 in Troup, Harris or Meriwether Counties; $24 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230.Single copy 50. FoR suascml,rlo call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. POSrMAS'IER: Send address changes toP. O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. S'rAI Publisher and Editor ............................................................................ John Kukyendall Advertising Director .................................................................................. Laurie Lewis Associate Editof ................................................................................... Clint Claybrook Business Manager ................................................................................. Jayne Goldston Assistant Editor ..................................................................................... Rob Richardson Staff Writers .......................................................................... Bryan Geter, Billy Bryant Composing ............................................................ Dewayne Flowers, Robert Weems Legals ........................................... . .......................................................... Jayne Goldston Circulation Manager ............................................................... Barbara Arlene Stcerman Pre Manager ................................................................................. Wayne Grochowski Pressroom Assistants ..................... Lan T Colleges, Zaddie Dixon,Damcll McCauley Mailronm Distribution ............................................................................... David Boggs COaPORArE President .................................. ., ......................................................... Millard B. Grimes Vice President .................................................................................. Charlotte S. Grimes Executive Vice President and Secretary ........................................ Laura Grimes Corer Treasurer ....................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garmtt Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary ............................................... James S. Grimes A Life Cut Short Way Too From Lewis Grizzard's collection 'Won't You Come Home Billy Bob Bailey?" Written in 1978 If Warren Newman had lived long enough to have had a book published, he would have mentioned me in it, I am sure. It's been months since he died. Sometimes, late at night, I still miss him hard. Warren Newman, for a country boy from Sandersville, Georgia, was quite sophisticated. He did-' n't like clich6s, or anything that was "hokey." I have put quotations around that word, "hokey," because it was a word Warren used a great deal. The man was an idealist, was what he was. That, and a perfectionist. He disliked such things as plastic flowers and neon cowboys. What he liked were old people who sat in front of country stores, dozing and telling good stories, dogs and Vienna sausages eaten direct- ly from a can on a riverbank. I SUPPOSE knowing all that about Warren Newman is what is making writing this so difficult. The last thing he would have wanted would have been-as he would have put it - "one of those God- awful sad stories about what a great guy I was." Maybe the only thing I can do to temper this is to leave out a log of gush about how much I will miss him and just stick to the parts about how he cracked me up and how a number of us who knew him best often wondered if he were really from this planet. Warren had a bizarre sense of humor, and his ideas and thoughts must have come from some celestial left field where the rest of us could never reach for inspiration. There was his Lyndon Johnson impression. He did Lyndon Johnson announcing he would not seek re-election better than Lyndon Johnson. I can still hear him - Warren, no Lyndon Johnson - pro- nouncing, "Mah feller Amuricahns...." What else. He was an artist. He did sketches, and they were quite good. He played guitar. He was an expert on the Civil War. HE OWNED a famous dog, "Springfield," the last of the long-nosed Egyptian coon hounds, which is another story. He snored with the best of them. I shared a tent with him for seven nights on a wilderness river somewhere out in Arkansas last summer, so I ought to know. The funny thing that hap- pened on that trip was one morning as we started to launch our canoes; we dis- covered a rattlesnake in Warren's. The three adults on the trip were all afraid to remove the snake, but, luck- ily, there was a 1S-year-old along who wasn't old enough to be frightened of rat- tlesnakes. We let him handle the situation while the three of us hid behind a tree. it. Damn, we missed thing there. Warren Newman, 31, into a tree in his Saturday morning, and dead. I went over to Saturday afternoon and ted his dog and talked to pretty, heartbroken wife. She told me about a poem she had written to husband a couple of a she was thinking about ing it put on his She asked me if I thou was "hokey." Here's the poem: Son of the Southland A dreamer, kind and wi More imagine Shone clearly in his That's not "hokey." says it. That says it all. ONE OTHER thing. Warren Newman was a tal- ented writer. Three years ago, he was a bartender. Then, he got a job at the newspaper helping count football contest ballots. Soon after that, hvMOST WIDELY READ became The Atlanta WRITER OF HIS TIME. Constitution's brightest sports star. The man was moving up fast. He would have left sports eventually, I am certain, and written of the world as he saw BY SPECIAL WITH HIS WIDOW," DEDRA, ED COLUMNS BY THE LATE GRIZZARD, BY MORELAND, AND BECAME 1 PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX 191 ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 AND BOOK WIDE. Meeting Mankind's Greatest Need A psychologist was once quoted as saying, "Man has two basic needs, one is to be loved and the other is to have someone to love." One must admit that statement has a world of truth in it, however, there is an even greater need experienced by man. During this time of year it seems that many needs arise. Our churcl receives -. numerOuscll,l0m pe0ple who have various needs and at this time of year those needs intensify. We do our best to try and help those with needs, some have need of food, others have need with medical bills, while still others have need Of even gas and water. God has blessed Antioch and we are thankful for the God given ability to help many who call. Although many calls are received and many folks are helped, there is one great need that no civic organization, no government program or even a church can meet. That is man's need of a Savior. More than the need of clothes and shelter, more than the need of food and water, and even more than the need of air, human beings need a Savior. While no earthly agency can supply that need, that need has already been supplied. It is the supplying of that need that allows us to celebrate what one secular song calls, "The most wonderful time of the yeai'." While studying for this past THIS INDEED is the r most wonderful time of the year and while the lights are brilliant, the decorations beautiful, and the excitement at a fever pitch, there is anoth- er reason for this time of year. It is the time of year that has been set aside to celebrate the giving of the greatest gift that could ever be given. The Bible says, "For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten son, that whoso- ever believeth in him, should not perish, but have everlast- ing life." Christmas is the time we celebrate God's gift that meets man's greatest need. , e Sumtays:nlage, I ran across a;liRlb quote that bears repeating. It said, "If man's greatest need had been infor- mation, God would have sent him an educator. If man's greatest need had been tech- nology, God would have sent him a scientist. If man's great- est need had been money, God would have sent him an econ- omist. If man's greatest need had been pleasure, God would have sent him an entertainer. But man's greatest need was forgiveness, so God sent him a Savior." That is the reason for such joy; that is the reason for such celebration; that is the reason for such a time as this, God sent his son to meet m greatest need. I said that there are some that here at Antioch can unfortunately there are those we help. MAY I SHARE with the one who is beyond God. No one is so good one is so bad that'the be saved. God's gift is a that is made available Like the s love, "It reaches to the est valley as well as to highest mountain." We here at Baptist Church hope that know what it is like to God's greatest gift mankind. As you begin to try to that perfect one special, please know the most perfect gift already been given - the of God's Son, the Lord Christ. Remember, the reason for the season. 50 Ye0000ars Ago.,, In.the Hogansville Herald *TOPVOTEGI page of the Dec. 3, 1953 Hogansvill Herald reported that"Henry popular memhant on Askew led the ticket of seven for office of city councilman at terday's city election here, with votes." *RETAIL BARGAINS OF TH DAY: The Belk-Gallant store "Tonic for a man's ego:" $1. The store also had dolls wif movable eyes for $1 and Hopalong Cassidy coloring outfit $1." CINEMA - Them was 1950s faro showing Royal Theatre that week. Gomey and the Bowery Boys weo appearing in 'Crazy Over GeneAutrey Team" and Tony Curtis starred "AllAmencan? But also, ule for the week was "Bandit in 3-D. *BIG IN PERSPECTIVE 1953, the term was more The Economy Auto store a 1954 Philco Big Screen 21-inc "larger than ever" television." FROM THE "Wanted: Two Opportunity to earn from $32.50 $68 per week."