"
Newspaper Archive of
The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
Lyft
December 12, 2002     The Hogansville Herald
PAGE 4     (4 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 4     (4 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
December 12, 2002
 

Newspaper Archive of The Hogansville Herald produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Opinions & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME Nvs-!)EC. 12, 2002 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS A trimc, tlubatton Millatd B. Gdme USPS 620-040 MIKE HAm PUBLI SHFaADVERTIS ING DIRb)R JOHN KAt ASSOCIATE PUBIJSHER]EDITOR ROB RICHARDSON ASSISTAN'r EDITOR JAYNE GOLDSTON B us L_.s MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 8462206 P. O. Box 426 ttogansville, Georgia 30230 Alcohol Consumption Continuing Upward If you read our newspa- pers each week, you proba- bly see my name on a num- ber of police stories. That is because I cover the police beat for a number of our newspapers. I have noticed recently, that more people under the age of 21 are being arrested for drinking, so I decided to look into the mat- ter a little more. What I found out was a little disheartening. According to the National Institute of Drug Abuse, dur- ing the year 2000, "66% of youth.that drink alcohol reg- ularly report usage of one or more illicit drugs." The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University reported earlier this year that a third of high school students say they binge drink at least once a month. L.  Ron Hubbard, an American author who spent nearly 30 years researching drugs and their effects on society, discovered that all drugs act very similarly in that little bit acts as a stimu- aswell, they usually associ- ate the drinking of alcohol with parties and good times with friends. That is also usu- ally the casewith movies and television shows as well. Because of the advertis- ing hype, it's no wonder at all that over half of the American adult population ends up consuming alcoholic beverages on a regular basis. According to the Institute of Alcohol and Alcohol abuse, 56.8% of the adult population drink on a regular basis. I FIND IT ironic that pharmaceutical companies are required to tell us all the side effects of their drugs, while alcohol commercials do not have to educate people on the effects drinking can have lant, such as a fewdrinks, on them. Cigarette packs Thenm0r6 of the e  ecen carry a ivarning label. acts as a sedative, as in some- body passing out from drink- ing a lot. Enough of the same drug consumed fast can kill a person. A good exmnple of this is the recent rash of deaths among college students from alcohol poisoning. Alcohol poisoning occurs when large amounts of alcohol are con- sumed ina short period of time. AS I SAID, recently I've noticed that police make a large number of arrests on underage drinkers. There are a number of reasons for that. First, it is because we tend to believe that alcohol is not as bad as other drugs. We warn our children about drug abuse, but we do not tell them I guess I shouldn't be too hard on the alcohol companies, occasionally they do say in their commercials that we should use a designated driv- er or drink responsibly. It is important to note at this point, more people die on our highways and other prob- lems associated with drink- hag than all illegal drugs being consumed combined. We all know, and have been told over and over, that substance abuse is America's number one social problem and is the root cause for many others. For example theft and murder. HOW DO WE address this problem? It is the responsibility of parents, friends and the alco- that alcohol can kill as well,, hol companies to teach our and in more ways than one. Because alcohol can be purchased legally, maybe we have molded the attitude that its not as bad as other drugs. If we believe that, then so will our teenagers. Each year, and especial- ly during the holiday season, the alcohol companies spend billions of dollars on adver- tising campaigns that help make drinking look glam: orous. The advertisements are almost seductive. Each year during the Super Bowl, everyone eager- ly awaits to see what the new Budweiser commercial will be. The companies are smart \\;children that just because something is socially accept- able, like drinking, that is not good for them and can led to serious health problems. By explaining to our chil- dren and teens, all the risks involved in drinking alcohol and the use of drugs, we may stand a chance of keeping them from making a mistake that is dangerous to them and others. Take the time to talk with your children and grandchil- dren about the dangers of using alcohol and drugs. For more information, visit http:llwww.narconon- books.com. 1"nt: HtX;ASSVU.I.E HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Gri Publications, at 3051 Rtxevelt Highway. Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $18 in Troup. HmTis or Meriwether Counties; $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales laxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230. FOR su: call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publicatkms, P. O. Box 426. Manchester, Georgia 31816. I-rMA,,,-n,R: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansvilte, GA 30230. STAFF Publisher and Advertising Director ............................................................... Mike Hale A,,x'iate Publisher and Editor ............................................................ John Kuykendall Busine, Manager ................................................................................ Jayne Goldston Assistant Editor ...................................................................................... Rtxh Richson StaffWriters .......................................................................... Bryan Geter, Billy Bryant. Assistant Advertising Manager. ................................................................ Laurie Lewis Adverlising Sales .: ...................................................................................... Linda Lester Composing ................................................................. Dewayne Flowe, Valinda h,ery Circulatkm Manager. ................................................................................... Judy Crews lgals ...................................................................................................... Jayne Goldston Ih'essrcml Manager. ....................................................................... Wayne Grochowski Pressnxml ........................................ David ggs, Larry Colleges. Stmmm Atkin C(mPOTE Om'Et President ............................................................................................. Millard B. Grimes Vice President .................................................................................. C'harlotte S.Q 5k-cretary .......................................................................................... Laura Grimes Corer "lkearer. ...................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garrett Lcga| Coun.l and Assistant Secretary .............................................. James S. Gfins How 1 Finally Quit Smoking (Written in 1987) You can't smoke anymore on New York commuter trains, and it probably won't be very long until you can't smoke anywhere. You probably can't smoke where you work now, and restaurants and planes are also becoming smoke-free. What happened is the anti- smokers, obnoxious though they can be, have won, and smokers have become out- casts and subjects of much derision. IF YOU SMOKE, there is only one plausible thing left for you to do. You must quit. I know. This comes from a man who smoked his head off for years and loved every cigarette he ever had. Smoking was one of the great pleasures of my life. A cigarette was like a little reward I gave myself twen- W-five to forty times a day. ButI quit. For severairea- sons: *I've already had two heart-valve replacement sur- geries and may one day face another. I need to smoke like I need getting poked in the eye with a sharp stick. -Very few of my friends smoke anymore. I began to feel uncomfortable smoking in front of them. *I fly 150 times a year. Airlines are turning off the smoking lights. *Flying makes me nerv- ous enough as it is without also craving a cigarette. .None of my friends believed I really had the courage to stop smoking. I quit to prove them wrong. HERE'S HOW I did it, after smoking for twenW- thr years. I made a pact with three friends that we would stop smoking together. I figured at least one of them wouldn't make it and I could start again, too. But they all stayed smokeless and I hung in there with them. When the craving was at its worst, I kept telling mys.elf, "Nobody ever died from stopping smoking." I also relied on others who quit long ago who said to me, "I know it's hard for you to believe now, but there will come a time you won't even think of a cigarette anymore." It took me three weeks to reach the point where I actu- ally had a thought other than having a cigarette. I substituted eating ice cream for smoking. I put on fifteen quick pounds and made the Haagen-Dazs peo- ple rich, but it still helped me quit smoking. I became an obnoxious nonsmoker myself. I berated a man (a small man) for light- ing up in a nonsmoking area of an Amtrak train and I bragged to friends who con- tinued to smoke after I quit: "Well, all I can say is, I'm glad I'm no longer a slave to tobac- co.,, If I ever start again, I would have to face much fin- ger-pointing and ridicule. That gives me strength to carry on. I gave myself an out. I'm going to start smoking again on my 90th birthday. BY SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT WITH HIS WIDOW, DEDRA,THE HOME 1S CARRYING SEIJECrED COLUMNS BY THE LATE LEWIS GRIZZARD, WHO GREW UP IN NEAR- BY MORELAND, AND BECAME THE MOST WIDELY READ GEORGIA TATER OF HIS TIME. GRIZZARD"3 BOOKS AND TAPES ARE STILL AVAIL- AB/Ag FORSALE THROUGH BAD BOOT PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX'191266, ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 AND AT BOOK AND MUSIC STORES NATION- WlDF Still Remembering Pearl Harbor Can it be 61 years have passed since that eventful day on December 7, 1941 when the Japanese officially entered World War H with its surprise desecration of Pearl Harbor in the Hawaiian Islands? In some ways it seems only yesterday, but so much has happened since that memorable Sunday morning, we reat it takes time for so many events to transpire. When this day rolled at in Athens and approaching my 15th birthday. We had only eleven grades in high school in those days. I started to school when I was five, so I was on target to graduate from high school at 16. Nothing was unusual at all about graduating from high school at 16. We grew up just as fast as we see our grandchildren and their friends grow up today. AS USUAL on Sunday mornings, I got home about 8 o'clock from delivering my route 12 Athens Banner- Herald paper route. The Sunday papers would start rolling off the press somewhere around 2 m. All paper route boys had to roll their papers, and load them in oversized bicycle baskets in a rainproof bag prior to delivering their routes. Back in December, 1941 the Athens Banner-Herald was published daily Monday through Friday and on Sunday. There was no Saturday paper at that lime. Normally I would get home from delive the Sunday morng ahner- Herald in time for a late breakfast. The daily editions were published in the after- noon. I would take a nap after my Sunday morning break- fast until I was called for Sunday dinner. I was expect- ed to be in Sunday School and church each Sunday after- noon where we had a great youth choir. Our mother had helped raise the funds to build this non-denominational chapel north of Athens named Holly Height This particular Sunday morning was no different than usual until I got an early awakening call from Mama telling that the Japanose were bombing Pearl Harbor. I remember I wasn quite sure about the location of Pearl Harbor until I learned it was in the Hawaiian Islands .... EVERYBODY was upset about the chain of events that would take place in the next few days. Teachers brought radios to school the following Monday where we listened to President Roosevelt ask Congress to declare a state of war existed between the United States and Japan. We were very excited! A day or so later, we heard the president ask for a dec- laration of war against both Germany and Italy, causing further excitement. Our principal had sever- al student body meetings this week some 61 years ago to urge the underage boys and girls to stay in school. We were told our time would come to join the service. several senior boys and one girl who were of age joined the service. Most of us that were underage thought we wanted to go, but stayed behind. It was at this time I decided to join the Navy when I was 17 years old, because most of my family was Navy. Little did  LDmli,iltose early days oY the tl |[mt I Would be in and out of Pearl Harbor several times and see the havoc spread by the enemy that fateful Sunday morning. Nor did I think our air- craft carrier would be anchored in Tokyo Bay fur- nishing air coverage for the signing of the peace aboard the Missouri on that happy day in September, 1945. - Thank God, the human mind tends to remember the better incidents in life and forget the more unpleasant stings. I am also grateful that December 7, 1941 had a good ending. Inthe Hogansville Herald preueeeu00toe00e tt00mme ttome s00vs *CATCH THE BUS: The upcoming state championship game between Hogansville and Camilla dominated the front page. "An estimated 500 fans will journey by special bus and pri- vate car to Americus Friday night where the Hogansville Green Wave football team of Coach Mike Castronis is expected to win the state title from (the) South Georgia Champions, Camilla High School's Purrthers." *lOOKING AHEAD TO 1953: "Departing seniors will leave a big gap in the Hogansville High School North Georgia Charroionns next year although its slight-of-hand artist, quarter- back Billy Pike, will be back again along with fancy running sppho- more Bobby WiUiams." * SUCH A BARGAIN: "Give your Christmas greetings per- sonai appeal by sending them First Class Mail for only three [n'UNE: "The children of the Johnson Street School will have an opportunity to eat a turkey dinner in the lunchroom because of a gift of surplus food by t federal govemment." A t 1103 6 I ! Comr Ter