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December 13, 2001     The Hogansville Herald
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December 13, 2001
 

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Opinions & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - DEC. 13, 2001 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS U3 62O-O4O Millard B. Grimes, President MInE HALE PbaLISADVERaSLnG DIRECTOr JOHN KUYKENDALL ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/EDrror DAN STOUT ASSOCIATE EDITOR JAYNE GO BUSINESS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 HogansviUe, Georgia 30230 Sale of Falcons Stirs Optimism There is always two ways to look at everything. There is the view of the optimist and the view of the pessimist. However, I don't see that any- one could take a pessimistic view for the sale of the Atlanta Falcons. The Smith family proba- bly made the best decision since purchasing the Falcons in 1965. While the Smiths have been dedicated and attempted to make the Falcons a winner, that has not happened. The "Birds" have only eight winning seasons to their credit and one trip to the Super Bowl (1998) to their credit. Arthur M. Blank, co- founder of Home Depot, has offered the Smith family $545 million for the team. Blank was quoted by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution as saying the purchase ful- filled a 15-year dream for him. He has stated that he would build the football team as he did Office Depot, by hir- ing the best coaches and play- ers. He also said he would key on why people want to come to the Georgia Dome. Well, that should be a sim ple question to answer. People want to go to the Dome to see a winner. The Falcons saw ticket sales increase greatly during 1998 and 1999. However, sales begin to plummet again in 1999 when the Falcons began losing. The question is, how do you make a winner of the Atlanta Falcons? That's not an easy ques- tion to answer. The Smiths have been dedicated to the team and trying to make it a winner. The hiring of Dan Reeves was a start. Reeves went to work immediately and did a fine job. It was his coaching and some pretty good play from the Falcons that put them in the Super Bowl in 1998. However, as soon as people figured out what the Falcons were doing, the wins started to end. The Smiths then went out and got themselves the number one draft pick this past season in an attempt to make the team a winner. Again, the Falcons proved they were not ready to be a contender. So, the Smith family has really tried to make the Falcons a win- P net. Now;, Blank will be charged with the responsi- bility of doing so. The ques- tion is, where to start? I think you start just like a peewee football team. You start with the basics. Blank must first of all make sure he has the best coaching staff possible. Not to say Reeves is not it. I personally like Dan Reeves as a coach, but I don't think the Falcons have a very good team of coaches. Coaching is just like playing: coaches must work together and know how to make their players understand what is expected of them. For a foot- ball coach to be successful, he must surround himself with coaches that can make his successful. In other words, they must be coach- es he respects, believes in and is willing to work with. So, you start with allowing Reeves, ffhe's chosen to lead the team, to hire his own coaching staff. Secondly, you need play- ers. Not necessarily players that will make you a winner today, but down the road. The Falcons need to look for young players that show they have the ability to play the" sport and the desire to win. Once you have the staff and the players, then you give them time. With a new coach- ing staff and a group of young players, it takes time to build a program. While many have been critical of the Smiths and their management of the Falcons, we should remem- ber they tried to build a win- ner. They were just not sure about how to do it. They looked for the complicated answer. Are our coaches good enough? What new players do we need? So on and so forth... And the answer was a simple one. Build a program, an instant winnen Blank will probably do well with the Falcons. As a mat'tr of fact, I'm kind of excit/d about the purchase. Even though they lose a lot, I'm still a Falcon fan. I think this will be a good thing for the Falcons and I think, Blank. He was successful at Home Depot because he gave people what they wanted at a reasonable price. In other "words, the simple basics of business. If he wants to make the Falcons a winner, then he will have to do the same: simply return to the basics. THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company. a division of Grimes Publications. at  1 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 6204)40. Subscription rates by mail: $18 in Troup, Harris or Meriwether Counties; $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all les taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogattsville, Georgia 30230. Foa su call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager. Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. Pt'-r s;R: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. STT Publis.r and Advertising Director .............................................................. .Mike Hale As-iate Publisher and Editor ........................................................... John Kuykendall i Business Manager ................................................................................ Jayne Goldston Assistant Pkiitor ...................................................................................... RtRicharson Staff Writers .......................................................................... Bryan Geter, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager .................................................................. Laurie Lewis Advertising S .................................................... : ................................... Linda Lester Composing ........................................................................ Valinda [very, Lauren King Legals ...................................................................................................... Jayne Goldston Preslan .......................................................................................... Wayne Gmchowski. Pressroom .......................................................................... David Boggs, Larry Colleges President ............................................................................................. Millard B, Grimes Vice President .................................................................................. Charlotte S. Grimes Secretary .......................................................................................... Laura Grimes Cofer Trrsurer ....................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garreu Legal Ctdnsel and Assistant Secretary .............................................. Janles S. Grimes He Could This kid has eight broth- ers and sisters. His father is dead. His mother finds work where she can, most- ly as a domestic. The family lives cramped in a small, run- down house in a mostly rural county. Sometimes, the kid shows up at school. Sometimes, he doesn't. School is hard. The teach- ers talk about things of which he knows nothing. Maybe he would try if he understood what the other kids seem to understand. He comes home at night and nobody asks, "What did you learn in school today?" His mother is too tired from too many years of walking against the wind to care. But there is at least one thing that is special about this kid. He is big and he is strong and he can run fast. His teachers promote him along because they don't think the kid has the ability to,learn. But he can play the game. And when he is play- ing, only then is he living. He finds he is better than others in at least something, and that something is play- ing the game. Everybody nieds a little self-esteem. He still isn't worth two cents in the classroom. But on Friday nights he owns the world. Nobody in his family has ever been to college. That's a laugh. Nobody in his fam- ily even made it out of high school with a diploma. BUT HIS COACHES tell this kid he might have a chance. He might have a chance to get an athletic scholarship. Maybe even to one of the big schools-- Oklahoma, Alabama, Ohio State, Georgia. But there is a problem. This kid is a senior in high school and he can't compose a simple sentence. He reads on a third-grade level. His grade-point average is a joke. He takes the Scholastic Aptitude Test. He doesn't understand the questions because he can't read them. He doesn't even understand the test moni- tor's instructions. He bombs. PERHAPS A FEW years earlier, he might still have been able to go to college and play ball. The National Collegiate Athletic Association had not raised its academic standards for student athletes back then. But now it takes a 700 on the SAT to be eligible for an athletic scholarship. This Been kid couldn't have scored a 700 if they added two of his test scores together. Before the changes in standards maybe this kid could have accepted the scholarship and have been enrolled in some sort of development studies pro- gram where instructors gave him special attention and might have just been able to fill the gaps left by his high school instructors and his home life. THE KID COULD have played ball. He could have been somebody. And maybe by playing ball, maybe by having his horizons broad- ened by travel and by being around and learning from his coaches and teammates, he could have been where he could go if he could learn to learn. Granted, it would have been a long" shot, but stranger things have hap- pened. But what's the use such conjecture? NCAA finally got tough academics and this kid caught under the roller. Serves him right being born into a no-win uation. BY SPECIAL MENT wrrH HIS DEDRA, THE HOME NEWS CARRYING GRIZZARD, WHO GREW NEARBY MORELAND, BECAME THE MOST READ GEORGIA WRITER HIS TIME. BUT HE GEORGIA, OF WHICH WROTE SO OFTEN, WHERE A PORTION OF FROM NEWNAN HOGANSVILLE IS NAMED HIS HONOR. THE GRIZZARD MUSEUM IN 1996, AND A WRITING EDITING LAB IS BEING BELOVED UNIVERSITY AND TAPES ARE', ABLE FOR SALE BAD BOOT PROiCHONS BOX 1912f, ATLANTA, 31111 To Clone Humans, Or Not to Since a research compa- ny reported recently that it had cloned the first human embryo, a movement has begun to ban human cloning by religious and political leaders. They see the announcement as a step toward cloning human beings. The research company, Advanced Cell Technology, says the cloning of the human embryo is aimed at producing cells for patients with a wide range of dis- eases. Several states have banned human cloning, and Congress is considering such a bill. President Bush also waded into the debate calling the cloning develop- ment morally wrong. "We should not as a society grow life to destroy it, and that is exactly what is taking place," he said. Condemning the devel- opment as well was The Vatican which said that promises of sensational cures from diseases could not justify the step. The event moves us to restate with force that the beginning of human life cannot be fixed by conven- tion at a certain stage of embryonic development; it takes place, in reality, already at the first instant of the embryo itself, a spokesman said. Another group, The National Right to Life Committee, wasted little time attacking the announcement. "This cor- poration is creating human embryos for the sole pur- pose of killing them and har- vesting their cells," a spokesman said. "Unless Congress acts quickly, this corporation, and others, will be opening human embryo farms." A critic of the company, who at one time sat on ACT's ethics board, said the announcement was prema- ture and would serve only to encourage such harsh reaction against cloning. "Nothing but hype." he said, "They are doing science by press release." With all the "hype" about their announcement, the company's top executive said they had no interest in transplanting such early embryos into a woman's womb to give birth to a cloned human being, nor was it clear that their embryo would be capable of that. "This work sets the stage for human therapeu- tic cloning as a potentially limitless source of immune compatible cells for tissue engineering and transplan- tation medicine," one of the researchers at ACT said. Several animal species have already been cloned into adults, and researchers feel sure human embryo cloning will follow. From the researchers' standpoint, bottom line is that according to them they do not want to make a whole cloned person. They only hope to find stem cells that can be har- vested and grown into genetically compatible replacement cells to treat a wide range of diseases, and that might take ten more years. From the standpoint the U.S. has voted to ban huJ cloning and the Senate might follow suit within next few weeks. Britain is heackoin same direction, that the practice is and unethical. From the reli standpoint, many are ing that cloning is morall wrong. Methodists, Baptists others, including President, have taken position. We are not to life to destroy it. My position is that God in Heaven created and the manner in which is to be reproduced we are flirting with authority when we prod far into this area. And then there is very timely question whether a manmade would have a soul. that all God's creation God very designed the human with a mind of its own a soul of its own. We don't know that cloned human, if there such a thing, would either. All We Need for Chrishmas Is... I remember when I was growing up, every year my mother would ask my broth- er and me what we wanted for Christmas. Being a num- ber of years older, my broth- er and I still get asked the same question by our moth- er, but now instead of asking what we want, she and my father want to know what we need. EverySunday morning at 8:30, before our radio broadcast, my mother will call me at the church. This past Sunday was no different. During the course of the con- versation, she asked the ques- tion she has asked for as long as I can remember, "Well, what do you need for Christmas?" Ijust want to go on record that I am thankful for a morn and dad that are still conce.wled about their children. Many times we read and hear of those parents who are anxious for their children to turn eighteen so they can get out on their own and sup- port themselves and relieve them of certain responsibili- ties. Today may I submit to you that I not only have an earth- ly father and an earthly moth- er who are concerned with what I need, I also have a Heavenly Father who is con- cerned about what I need. If you have trusted Christ as Savior. you too have a Heavenly Father who is con- cerned about what you need. But, if you have not trusted Christ as Savior, you do not have a Heavenly Father, but there is a God in Heaven who is concerned about what you need. The Bible tells us that God in Heaven knows what we have need of even before we can tell him. T Of all the things we might think we have need of this Christmas, the one thing every human being needs is the Lord Jesus. Jesus is God's gift to this Earth. Romans 6:23 says, "For the wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord." God knew this world would need a Savior and when the time was perfectly righL he sent his only son Jesus. Today, all this world really needs is Jesus. You may be thinking, I am already saved and do not heed a Savior, but Jesus is more than a Savior. I am in no. way belittling eternal life and the home in Heaven that comes with trusting Christ, but when Jesus becomes our Savior, we have more than eternal life and a home in Heaven. Paul told the Ephesian church in Ephesians 1:3, Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who hath blessed us with all spiritual blessings in heavenly places in Christ." With faith in Christ, we have everything we need to live joyful, abun- dant and victorious lives. Today I want to share with you that this Christmas everyone needs Jesus because Jesus is all we need. Allow me to use an Old Testament scripture to illus- trate what I mean. in Isaiah 9:6, "For unto us child is born, unto us a son given: and the shall be upon his and his name Wonderful, Counsellor, Mighty God, Father, The Prince of Peace In this verse we revealed to us what God the world when he gave son Jesus. These names Jesus give to us what jest# is to us. HIS name iS Wonderful, Jesus is all e need for the dullness of life- His name is Counsellor is all we need for the sions of life. His name is Tl Mighty God, Jesus is all we His name is Father, Jesus is all we for the dimensions of life: o past, our present and future. His name is Prince of Peace, Jesus we of life. Today God has given us all we need Christmas in his son Have you received this gift?