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The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
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December 14, 2000     The Hogansville Herald
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December 14, 2000
 

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Opinions & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - DECEMBER 14, 2000 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 62o-o4o A (6rims ltuhliatn Millard B. Grimes, President M. PUBLISHER]ADvFSRTISING DIRECTOR JOHN KL ASkcdK:IATE PUBIaSI:R/EDn'OR BRYAN GmR IATF, EDITOR JAV GOLDSTON BUSINESS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 30230 Georgians Support "Zero Tolo'a0000ce " Almost 16,000 people lost their lives as a result of impaired driving last year in the United States of America. That figure calculates to one fatality every 33 minutes. At least one driving under the influence arrest is made every 47 seconds as well. Those statistics are staggering and our communities are not immune. IN GEORGIA, driving under the influence of alcohol Or drugs claims the lives of S00 people per year at a cost of $2.9 million per fatality, and is responsible for thousands of injuries at a cost of $73,000 per injured survivor, according to the Governor's Office of Highway Safety (GOHS). The holiday season is an espe- cially crucial time of the )rear for concern over impaired driving and its impact on the communi- ty. With the proliferation of cel- ebrations, the potential for more impaired drivers to be on the roads is even greater. THE GOHS has issued a state- ment of "No Tolerance" for those 6 ca-lrdriving diir- - ing the holidays.. Law enforce- ment will be out in full force to prevent impaired driving by set- ting up saturation patrols and sobrieW checkpoints. This is part of the state's "If You Drink and Drive, You Lose" program. The program was launched in July in an attempt to reduce fatalities and injuries caused by drunk or drugged drivers on Georgia high- ways. SINCE THE HOLIDAY sea- son is the deadliest time of the year on the highways due to drunk or drugged drivers, the month of December has been des- ignated as National Drunk and Drugged Driving Prevention Month. On December 15, law enforcement authorities begin the National Holiday Lifesavers Weekend with "Lights on for Life" day. Motorists nationwide will be asked to express support of the zero tolerance program by driving with their headlights on during daylight hours to com- memorate those who have died as a result of impaired driving accidents. THE STATE is sending a clear message this holiday season, "Drinking and driving will not be tolerated." Law enforcement officers will be on the lookout for impaired drivers during the hol- idays. "Impaired driving has a dev- astating effect on our communi- ty," said Yvonne L. McBride, "Motorists nationwide will be asked to express support of the zero toler- ance program by driving with their headlights on during daylight hours to commemorate those who have died as a result of impaired driving acci- dents." director of the GOHS. : "The vigilant efforts of GOHS and its partners, the Georgia Association of Chiefs of Police, the Georgia Sheriff's Association, and the Georgia State Patrol, will help make roads and highways safe from those irresponsible individuals who make fatal decisions to drive after drinking or using drugs." IF YOU are planning on attending a holiday function and alcohol will be served, you may want to consider the following options before attending: Designate a driver who will not be drinking at the function; Make plans to spend the night at the location of the event; Use alternative transporta- tion, such as taxis, other ride ser- vices or friends. While the GOHS is doing their job to keep our roads safe this holida season, so should we as private citizens. Today, most cars have phones and those that are not equipped with them usually have a driver with a cellular phone. I would encourage every- one to use those phones to report impaired drivers. IT'S JUST this simple, when we allow people to drink and drive on Georgia highways, we all lose. Do your part to keep our roads safe by not drinking and driving and reporting those who do. Also, show your support of the no tolerance campaign by dri- ving with your headlights on this Friday. THE HOGASVnJ HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star'-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $16 inTroup, Heard or Meriwether Counties; $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230. FoR suasougrlor call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. POSTMAS'm Send 'address changes to P. O. Box 426. Hogansville, GA 30230. STAFF Publisher and Advertising Director .................................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ............  ................................................... .John Kuykendall Associate Editor ............................. . .................................................................... Bryan Geter Assistant Editor ........................................................................................... Rob Richardson Busine Manager ....................................................................................... 3ayne Goldston Staff Writers ....................................................................... Michael C. Snider, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager ........................................................................ Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ................................................................................................. Loft Camp Assistant Editor .......................................................................................... .Rob Richardson Composing ..................................................... Valinda Ivery, Deborah Smith, Lauren King Legals ............................................................................................................. Jayne Goldston Receptionist and Classifieds .............................................................................. Cleta Young Production Manager .............................................................................................. Todd Laird Pressroom ................................................................. David Boggs and Wayne Grochowski COmmSATE OrncEns President ....................................................... i ............................................ Millard B. Grimes Vice President ........................................................................................ Charlotte S. Grimes Secretary ................................................................................................ Laura Grimes Corer Treasurer .............................................................................................. Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Counsd and Assistant Secretary ..................................................... James S. Grimes My Dog's Really a Genius Newsweek magazine recent- ly came out with a cover story entitled, "How Smart Are Animals?" Pretty smart, concluded the reporters, who told of chimps who know sign language, a horse that could count, and pigeons with remarkable memories. I wasn't surprised to find out animals know as much as they do because I live with Catfish, the black Lab, whose intelligence often is astounding. Even when he was a puppy, he was bright. When he commit- ted an indiscretion on my living- room rug, I said to him, sternly, "Catfish, never do that on my liv- ing-room rug again!" Sure enough, the next time he didn't go on the living-room rug. He went on the rug in the den. He also learned at a very early age that if he kept whining, no matter how long I ignored him, I finally would give in and share the food on my plate with him. He's especially fond of pizza. AS HE GOT older, Catfish became even smarter. He discov- ered that twice a week, at approx- imately 6 a.m., a guy shows up in a truck to take away my garbage. After that, at the precise moment the garbage truck drove into my driveway, Catfish would come to my bed and bark direct- ly into my ear at a decibel level only slightly lower than a train wreck, to awaken me to the fact that a stranger was making off with our garbage. It is only recently Catfish stopped doing that. Once he heard the Supreme Court had ruled a person's garbage is not private, he figured why bother protecting ours any longer. Catfish's vocabulary also amazes me. He knows the word "go"," for instance. When I say that word, regardless of context, he imme- diately races to the garage and scratches on my car door. My dog is making Earl Scheib, the famous :car painter, a fortune. Catfish also knows the word "no." Whenever I say that word, it's a signal to ignore me completely. Catfish even knows the word "Domino's." He hears that, knows there's pizza involved he drools on my trouser leg. WHAT CATFISH knows is how to get to me.i does it with those eyes. How do dogs know they{ get anything they want just look at you with those loving eyes that ask, me?" and plead, "Please don't Catfish does it to me leave him. Those eyes. "I'll be back in three say. Those eyes. "I've got to go. Those eyes. ! "Okay, you can invite! your friends over for pizza moon-howling while I'm call Domino's from It's tough living with an mal who's smart enough to a sucker when he sees one. A Real Southern Lady...or Am I Just after Thanksgiving, one of the sisters called to invite me to coffee on Saturday, December 9, from 3 to 5 p.m. I mentioned to my would be hostess that I would have company that weekend, but would try to slip out and come to her home for a few minutes. Such a lovely home it is in the heart of Gay which is where I usu- ally tell folks I'm from now. I tried saying Meriwether County for a while, but I'd always be asked what town. Though I have a Greenville phone number, and a Woodbury address, I live just three miles from Gay, so I say Gay. Unless it is a delivery service. Then giving directions can get complicated. The locals call my road one thing while the map gives it another name. For the most part, it is quiet country, and I love it. BUT IT was not always quiet country. In the early twentieth century Gay was a busy cotton production community and home to a prominent cotton merchant who built a grand two story brick home which is still occupied by his two daughters. My husband had met the two sisters in 1998, just after we moved here. They came by our house while they were out cam- paigning for their niece who was running for public office. I missed them that day, but was welcomed into their home on two occasions earlier this year. So gracious they are. Well informed. Well educated. Well traveled. And the kicker.., they are real southern ladles. A rarity these days. So, Saturday came and so did all my company. I'd been cooking for two days previously so I could be free to enjoy the day. I arose quite early and slipped into a favorite pair of black jeans and my best-looking festive red.sweat- shirt. IT WOULD BE a glorious day. I was sure of it. From my early morning time, with just me and my sister, right through our 8 p.m. tram ride through the Fantasy of Lights over at Callaway Gardens. Ah, yes, it would be a good day. My friend, Betty, arrived around noon. She also had been invited to the afternoon coffee. About 3:30 p.m., she and I slipped out, leaving a house full of guests to fend for themselves. My sister had laid down for a short nap, but my husband assured me he could hold down the fort. THE COFFEE was unlike any coffee I'd ever experienced in sub- urbia. I was unprepared for an event. Perhaps the event of the season. Could be that nothing tops it throughout the year, except maybe the Cotton Pickin' Fair. No hay bales at the home of the sisters, however, only pressed linen napkins, the finest china, and sparkling silver service amidst an awesome Christmas theme. Dozens of women, at least 50 or so at all times, with cars constantly coming and going out intha grand old circular drive. ......... WHAT A DELIGHTFUL time I had. I met so many ladies. Of course I can only recall a few names, but it was a beginning. I did talk for a while with one who'd lived in Gay for ten years and" another for 14 years. Both acknowledged that they were still outsiders. But nobody felt like an out- sider on Saturday. Not hardly. Time stood still as the old south arose from the ashes of yester- year to offer a promise of hope to all who would still be called a southern lady. At least, that's how I felt in my heart. OF COURSE, forever, hold it to ourselves. returned home, more had arrived. My sister was 1 ciously attending all. walked through the door mouth fell open. "Tell me you didn't," gasped. 'Didn't what?" "Wear jeans to an coffee? Tell me you didn't." 'Vgell, yes,' I did." "I knew I should not down for that nap. something earlier, ask were wearing, drOl: perhaps you should they let you in the door?" 'vVhat: r 0er wearing?" THE SUEDE suits and tiful dresses, diamonds flashed vividly in my mind's She knew she had me look on my face. 'rDon't worry. I said anything at all. Most know how weird writers anyway. Besides I'm sure hostesses were real ladies." Did she mean I didn't chance? I didn't dare ask. few brief minutes time still, and I'd felt like a real ern lady. For the moment that enough for me. Was It Really a lrwgin Birth Last week we considered the identity of the baby in the manger as characterized by three words found in some very familiar passages of scripture. This week let's turn our atten- tion from the baby Jesus to Mary. THE BIBLE does not say much about Mary, but what it does have to say is of much sig- nificance. However, there is a danger of reading into the words of scripture rather than digging out the meaning from the scrip- ture, which has resulted in some of the misconceptions about Mary. The Bible does not say that Mary is the mother of God, but the Bible does say that Mary was found to be highly favored among women. We reject the idea that Mary is the mother of God because that implies a beginning. As we said last week, Jesus was God in the flesh, but he did not originate with Mary. Mary is not the mother of God, but she was the vehicle who God used to send his only son into the world. MARY WAS, however, a vir- gin. The Bible says in Luke 1:26- 27, "And in the sixth monththe angel Gabriel was sent from God unto a city of Galilee, named Nizareth, to a virgin espoused to a man whose name was Joseph, of the house of David; and the Virgin's name was Mary." Also the Bible says in Isaiah 7:14, "Therefore the Lord himself shall give you a sign; Behold a virgin shall con- ceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel." There are those who have tried to argue that Mary was just a young maiden and not really a virgin. They say it is utterly impossible for her to have had a baby. To those I sim- ply call their attention to Luke 1:37, "For with God nothing shall be impossible." To some who have never really considered the issue, this may seem a bit trivial. But the fact of the mat- ter is, it is far from trivial. TItE FACT that Mary was a virgin is vital to God's plan of salvation. We read in Genesis that God created Adam in His own image and after His like- ness. Adam was created perfect and in complete fellowship with God. Because Adam chose to disobey God, that perfect rela- tionship and fellowship was lost. Now when man begot offspring, it was after the likeness and image of Adam. (Genesis 5:3) The sinful nature of Adam was now passed on to all human beings. That is the reason Paul tells us in Romans all are sin- ners and lost in Adam. IF JESUS would have had an earthly father, that same sinful nature from Adam would have been passed down to Jesus, thus disqualifying him as a perfect sacrifice for sin. "Behold a virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel" If Jesus would have had an earthly father, he could not have been our Savior. THE VIRGIN BIRTH is paramount to  salvation. God the penalty by a perfect sacrifice. men could not have paid their own sin, Jesus was substitute. Jesus paid ty for sin that the rest human race could not pay. The sole purpose for leaving the glory of Heavetl j coming to this Earth for the sins of mankind. Bible says in Luke 19:10," the Son of Man is come to WE MUST understand Jesus to be savior, he had perfect. in his divinity, ity to be perfect and not Adam's sin nature, he had born of a virgin. Home