"
Newspaper Archive of
The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
Lyft
December 19, 2002     The Hogansville Herald
PAGE 4     (4 of 12 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 4     (4 of 12 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
December 19, 2002
 

Newspaper Archive of The Hogansville Herald produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




O[00inions &amp; Ideas A ($rm tliratn linrtl B Grim, I%mlem THE HOGANSVILLE HOME usPs 62o-o4o HA E PUBLISHER/ADVERTI: '(; DIRECTOR JOHN KUYI a)ALL ASSOCIATE PUBIJ tFJEDITOR ROB RICI RDSON ASSISTAN'I DITOR JAYNE GOU)6WON BUSINESS MANAGER Fhhone (706) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgm 30230 Tips for Keeping Off Holiday Time Bulge I was reading a magazine article the other day and ran across an interesting one about the holidays and how we all end up putting on extra pounds. According to the article, most people will gain between five and 15 pounds during the holidays from Thanksgiving until New Year's That's an awful lot of weight gain and at first I couldn't believe it. Then, after thinking about it for a little while, I could under- stand how it could happen. If your home is anything like mine, during the holidays there are a lot more snacks around. For example, we usu- ally keep a candy dish with some hard candies or mints. However, when the holidays arrive that dish gets filled with miniature chocolate bars, Hershey's kisses and other holiday favorites. We always say we're put- ting them out for company, but I end up eating most,of it. Then there's the holiday cakes, pies and cookies. Not to mention the large meal for Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year's. We really do eat a lot more during the holidays than any other time of the year. Parties and the office snacks certainly don't help matters any. If your office is like ours, the ladies like to bring homemade snacks and goodies. We can become uncomfortable if we feel as though me might be disap- pointing someone we care about. It's tough to say, "No, thank you," because we're afraid we might hurt their feelings. It's the same way with parties. HERE ARE A FEW tips that might help you get through the holidays without putting on so many of those holiday pounds. Thinking about what you're eating is one way tO Of all the tips, this is the rdest one to do. But we have to make a concentrated effort to avoid consuming large amounts of fats, sugar and baked goods. Foods like mashed potatoes, pies, cook- ies and bread are often the culprits responsible for the huge holiday weight gain. Innocent-looking eggnog can pack on the calories. Try eat- hag more fruits, vegetable, lean meats and fish. Blaming your diet plan is the best way to keep from hurting the feelings of your friends and your hostess at a party. To avoid insulting either of them, just blame your diet plan. Tell them you're on a weight reduction points system and ff you go over you'll be charged a sub- stantial forfeit by your diet center. Beware of your alcohol intake. At seven calories per gram, alcohol is highly caloric, second only to fats. Not only can a couple of drinks add several hundred calories to your meal, it can affect your ability to made good food choices. Keep working out. Unfortunately, I'm in a job that doesn allow me a lot of time to visit a gym. But the only way to keep your weight under control is by diet and exercise. Weight-training has been proven to be one of the best way to burn calories and build lean muscle tissue. Make sure you continue to work out about two to three times weekl) _o help main- tain your g@:,.i physical con- dition and w.<,xi putting on body fat. start. If you put a little extra,, THFE Al 0 many other thought into what you're eat' ',,helpful hints c,n be found in ing you will make better choices. For instance, eat a roast turkey sandwich rather than a hamburger to save some calories. One of the biggest mis- takes we make during the hop idays is gorging ourselves at meal time. We want to try everything. Don't over indulge on a huge meal. Eat smaller portion more often. If you're going to a party, eat a little snack before you go, that way you won't fill up on those high caloried chips, dips and other party foods. book writ; a by James lepigue. V Alepigue is an ISSA certi! ed personal trainer and  AonaUy recog- nized authority on health and exercise, he lives in the New York City area. If you would like to find out how to purchase the book, or for more hlformation, you may e-mail Hatbeleigh Press at hatherleighpress.com. Have a very Merry Christmas and remember to say, "Ho-Ho-No" to those hop iday goodies. See ya'll next year. THE HOGANSVlLLE HOME NEWS is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester. Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $18 in Troup. Harris or Meriwether Counties; $26 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230. Ftm smcluerme call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, E O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. Pos: Send addre changes to P. O. Box 426. Hogansville. GA 30230. STAFF t Publisher and Advertising Director .............................................................. Mike Hale As.xiate Publisher and Editor ........................................................... John Kuykendall Busine Manager ................................................................................. Jayme Goldston Assi.,aant Editor ...................................................................................... Rob Richardson StaffWriters .......................................................................... Bryan Geter. Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manag ................................................................ ,Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales .................................................................................... ,...Karen Grant Conaposing ....................  ............................................ Dewayne Flowers, Valinda lvery Circulation Manager. ................................................................................... Jud3,' Crews Legals ...................................................................................................... Jayne (kldston Pressroom Manager ........................................................................ Wayne Gnx-howski Prcsxm ................................................................................................ Larry Colleg TE OEE sident ............................................................................................. Millard B. Grimes Vice ident .................................................................................. Charlotte S. Grimes Secretary ............................................ :. ............................................ Laura C.fimes Coler Treasurer ....................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary .............................................. James S. Grimes PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME - DEC. 19, 2002 His Best ChristmasGift Ever (Wlten in 1988) I was on a call-in radio show in Birmingham, Alabama. When you write a book, they make you travel and do call-in radio shows. Publicity is my life. We were in the second hour in Birmingham. A lady had complained about some- thing I'd written about Oral Roberts, somebody else wanted to know if I planned to get married again, and then a man called and said he knew my late father. "He taught me in high school in Atlanta," the man said. "He was an unforget- table character." Indeed. A number of peo- ple have contacted me over the years and said they had come across Lewis, Sr. One such person called and said, "Your daddy owes me three hundred dollars. I let him borrow it in Kingsport, Tennessee, in 1962." After informing the indi- vidual of my father's demise, I asked him, "How long did you know my father before you lent him the three hun- dred dollars?" "About an hour," was the reply. "My good man," I said, "you are one of many with the same experience." MY FATHER WAS a lot of things, but more than any- thing else, he was a soldier. He served in World War II and In Korea. The Purple Hearts and the Bronze Star he earned hang on my office wall. In Korea, his outfit was overrun by the Chinese com- munists. He survived by hid- ing under dead comrades and later by hiding for sixteen days in a cave, as his enemy walked about him. When he finally made it back to the American lines, his feet were severely frost- bitten, he was suffering from malnutrition, and he would never again be the man who went off to war a second time in 1950. He returned home to Fort Beaning. I was four. He drank heavily. He screamed out in the night. Eventually, he left my mother and went AWOL and spent the rest of his life roaming, drinking, and living off his considerable charm. I have no idea how many different jobs my daddy held between the time he left the army and his death in 1970, but somehow he always man- aged to be able to get a teach- ing position whenever he wanted one. "Your daddy," the man on the radio told me, "would make us laugh with all his car- ryings-on, and he would tell us about what happened to him in the war. "And the thing I remem- ber most was how he used his experience to teach us never to give up no matter how bad things looked. "HE SAID THERE were times in Korea he felt it would just be easier on him to die than to live in the situation he was in. "He told us how his feet were swollen and bleeding and how he was afraid to move in that cave because the enemy might find him. But he said he just made up his mind he wasn't going to die out there, and that's what pulled him through." We'd been on the line a long time. I thankedthecaUer !M but ,,he was in Vietnam," he said. "I was wounded and was left behind in a hot landing I H zone. I foun "I didn't know if anybodyt se t tc was coming back for me ort'th e j ff the enemy would find me. t LaGr But I hid myself and I heldl:Jack  on and I got out of there. ! TI "I wanted to give up, too+t o be but I kept thinking abut yourlGard, father. If Captain Grizzardtith e c could make it, I told myseff, t n F2 so could I. I give him credit! T for my being alive today. He!Jun e was a great man." i annu; I thanked the caller onei'mer 1 more time---for perhaps thet built best Christmas gift Ive ever[vol  had. } each BY SPECIAL ARRANGEMENq" "1 wrnt mSWmOW, DEDRTHE HOm " NEWS IS CARRYING COLUMNS BY THE LATE LEWIS GRIZZARD, WHO GREW UP IN NEAR- BY MO, AND BECAME TH MOST WIDELY READ GEORGIA, WRITER OF HIS TIME. GRIZZARD'$ ; BOOKS AND TAPES ARE STILL AVAI - AmrORSAtaamOUGH BAO mYr PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX 191266. ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 AND AT WIDF Meeting the Greatest Need of A psychologist was once quoted as saying, "Man has two basic needs, one is to be loved and the other is to have someone to love." One must admit that statement has a world of truth in it; however, there is an even greater need experienced by man. During this time of year it seems that many needs arise. Our church receives numerous calls from people who have various needs and at this time of year those needs intensify. We do our best to try and help those with needs; some have need of food, others have need with medical bills, while still oth- ers have need of even gas and water. God has blessed Antioch and we are thankful for the God-given ability to help many who call. Although many calls are received and many folks are helped, there is one great need that no civic organiza- tion, no government program or even a church can meet. That is man's need of a Savior. More than the need of clothes and shelter, more than the need of food and water and even more than the need of air, human beings need a Savior. While no earthly agency can supply that need, that need has already been supplied. It is the supplying of that need that allows us to celebrate what 6he secular song calls, "the most wonder- ful time of the year." THIS INDEED is the most wonderful time of the year and while the fights are brilliant, the decorations beautiful, and the excitement ata fever pitch, there is anoth- er reason for this time of year. It is the time of year that has been set aside to celebrate the giving of the greatest gift that could ever be given. The Bible says, "For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten son, that whoso- ever believeth in him, should not perish, but have everlast- hag life." Christmas is the time we celebrate God's gift that meets man's greatest need. While studying for this past Sunday's message, I ran across a little quote that bears repeating. It said, "If man's greatest need had been infor- mation, God would have sent him an educator. If man's greatest need had been tech- nology, God would have sent him a scientist. If man's great- est need had been money, God would have sent him an econ- omist. If man's greatest need had been pleasure, God would have sent him an entertain- er. But man's greatest need was forgiveness, so God sent him a Savior." That is the reason for such joy; that is the reason for such: celebration; that is the rea- son for such a time as this, , l God sent his sonto meet man sI greatest need. I said earlier" that there are some that we here at Antioch can help and unfortunately sometimes there are those we cannot help. May I share with you the good news that there is no one who is be y_o,  ,le of God. No one is' they need not be saved and: no one is so bad that they can- not be saved. God's gift is a gift that is made available to i all. Like the song says about God's love, "It reaches to the lowest valley as well as to the highest mountain." We here at Antiochi ' Baptist Church hope that you: know what it is like to e6joy God's greatest gift to mankind. From myself asi: well as all the folks here at Antioch, we would like toi express our desire that each of you have a very Merry Christmas. 50 Years Ago,,. Intl00 Hogansville Herald dJTOPIA: The Dec. 18, 1952 front page was filled with the joy- ous news of Hogansville defeat- ing Camilla to become class B state football champs. "The Lions Club called the populace togeth- er at the Community Building Tuesday night to crown the new Class B state foolball champions and to honor the team and coach- es...Hogansville had the end of a perfect season at Americus last Friday night in winning from Camilla 33-0 for the state title in class B football." GAS FACTS: "The mini- mum charge for gas users is $1 per month. You put up $5 for a deposit if you de not live more than 200 feet from the street when they put your meter in." LEADING THE WAY: "Eagle Scout Jimmy Link of Troop 47, sponsored by U.S. Rubber Gom0any, in Hogansville, is the first boy to register for the 1953 jamboree to be held at Irvine Ranch, California. TheYWill leave Atlanta and go by Pullman train..."" MOVING RIGHT ALONG: "Pasture crops are the basis for a profitable and permanent live- stock industry, according to agronomists."