"
Newspaper Archive of
The Hogansville Herald
Manchester, Georgia
Lyft
December 20, 2001     The Hogansville Herald
PAGE 4     (4 of 14 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 4     (4 of 14 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
December 20, 2001
 

Newspaper Archive of The Hogansville Herald produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Opinions & Ideas THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-040 MAKE. Ha: pu BLISHFa]ADVITISIN(; DIRECqaSR JoHN KUYKENDALL /%qOCIATI-: PUBI,ISHEI'EDITOR ROB RICHARDSON ASSIKFAN'F EDITOR J:,'E GOLI.,'TON B u s l,Xk, 1VLLN AGER tone (706) 846-3188 Fax (70) 846-22(k5 E O. Box 426 Hogmsville. Geota .)23/3 A (fili ttbliratimt MiHard B, Grimes, President Christmas Joy Lives in Family bring expensive gifts, but you kiaew if you needed them at any time, they would be there for you. Today, we don't even know the names of all our neighbors. My grandmother always had something cooking in the kitchen and everyone that came to visit had to either "eat before they left," or "take a plate home for later." There weren't a lot of "store bought" goodies at my grand- mother's house. No siree, she cooked tea cakes, carmel candy, and so on and so on. The house always smelled so good. Today, we're lucky if we eat Christmas dinner at home. Yes, things have changed greatly since I was a young This is the busiest time of year for all businesses and the newspaper office is no different. The other night, I was working all alone at the office and I guess because it was so quiet I thought about Christmas as I was working, and how much it has changed since I was a little boy: When I was growing up in Harris County, we didn't have an abundance of pres- ents under the tree every year, but what we did have was family time. The entire family would gather at anoth- er family members home, usually my Aunt Ruth's, and we would enjoy the time together. While we didn't give each other expensive gifts, we enjoyed a lot of good food and fellowship. Today, we're too busy for such things as we fight to make a living and do the things we like to do. So now, only the immediate- ly family at best, gathers for Christmas. The other thing I remem- ber most about Christmas when I was younger, was that the Christmas spirit grabbed t everyone. There waslotsof boy, and not just about Christmas activities at the Christmas. It seems that we local churches. The cities have changed greatly as a people. The problem is sim- ply this.., we've seemed to have forgotten what Christmas is about. It's about caring for your family, friends and neighbors. It's about helping those who can't help themselves. It's about doing something good, not because you have to but because you want to and it feels good doing it. However, most of all it is about Jesus. The man who was born with nothing and died on a cruel tree so that we might enjoy life and be comfortable in death. This Christmas, take the time to think about Jesus. With him you will find Joy, Eternal peace, Substance to fill any void in our life, Undeniable love for would all have events and everyone would turn out for them. It was a time of love and peace in each communi- ty. Today, we've seemed to have lost the community fel- lowship that came with Christmas. All the kids awaited Christmas Eve night antici- pating the arrival of Santa. We knew we would receive lots of candy and fruits and a couple of toys to our liking. Other family members usu- ally gave us clothes and we were grateful for them. Today, we buy Playstations that cost more than all our gifts combined back then. So, Christmas has become much more commercial today. The thing I remember most. was all those visits from our friends and neigh- " all, and Strength to face life's bors during the holidays. hallenges and troubles. L Back then, folks visited their neighbors at Christmas to ',Vlerry Christmas and wish them well. They didn't God.less. Support Local Charities THIS HOLIDAY SEASON THF H(N;ANSVILI,E HOME NEWS is published weekl) by the Slat-Mercury Publishing Company. a division of Grim Publications. at 305 t Relt Highx ay, Manchester. Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subription rates by m:dl: $18 in Troup, Harris or Meriwether Counties: $26 a year elwhere. Prices include all ates taxes. Pedhal ixsrage paid at Hlsville. Georgia T230. FOR st'mergs call 706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mcrctu'y Publications. P. O. Box 426. Manchester. Georgia 31816. PiSLR: Send address changes to E O. Box 426. Hogasville. GA 30230. STAF1F iubliher and Advertising Dir:tor ............................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and Editor ........................................................... John Kuykendall Buincs Manager ................................................................................ Jayne 'ton Assistant Fatkor ...................................................................................... Rob Richardson altWdtc .......................................................................... Ban Geter. Bill)' Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager .................................................................. Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ...................................................................................... ,Linda tester Comlsing ........................................................................ Valinda lvery, Lanren King Legals ..................................................................................................... Jayne Goldston - Psman .......................................................................................... Wayne Grocho ski Prcssnxm .......................................................................... David Boggs, Larry Colleges CORPORATE OFFttXRS President ............................................................................................. Millard B. Grimes Vice President ................................................................................ Oaadotte S. Secretary. ......................................................................................... Laura Grimes Corer Tre ....................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garrett I_.gal Couresel and Aistant S ............................................. James S. PAGE 4 - HOGANSVII2 HOME NEWS - DEC. 20, 2001 Skiing CanBe Fun; Trust Me Deer Valley, Utah -- Skiing can be a lot of fun. My favorite parts are tak- ing off those heavy boots at the end of the day and get- ting some feeling back in the hands and feet several hours after I have left the frigid slopes. But snow skiing does have its annoyances, and people should be made aware of these befor they decide to take up the sport and go out and spend a lot of money on equipment and airline tickets to take them to such ski resorts as Deer Valley, which is located in the majestic Wasatch Moutnains, fifty minutes from the airport in Salt Lake City where a lot of Mormons live. As a public service to those who may think they would ELke to join the grow- ing hordes of snow skiers, I thought I better mention a few of the problems. LEARNING TO SKI -- It is easy to learn to ski. All you do is point your skis downhill and off you go. What is difficult to learn is how to turn on skis and how to stop on skis. I saw a man ski into a condominium once because he had not learned to turn or stop. He was fine after they turned his head back in the right direction, but the owner of the condo's wife, who was having a tup- perware party when the intruder skied into her liv- ing room, was never they same after the incident. SKIING CAN BE A HASSLE -- The pain-in-the- neck factor in skiing is one of the highest in outdoor sports. You have to carry your skis a lot, and they are heavy and unwieldy. You have to learn to walk in those boots, which hurt your feet and ankles, and you have to wear long underwear which itches. If you don't like heavy lifting, your feet and ankles hurt- ing and itching from long underwear, I sugggest you forget skiing and take up bowling, where the only bad part is wearing those silly looking red and green shoes. FALLING -- Every skier, no matter how advanced he or she becomes, occasionally will fall into the snow. This can be painful, not to mention humiliating. When you fall, it is best to feign a heart attack so nobody will think you are so unathletic you couldn't find the finger- holes in a bowling ball. FIFTEEN-YEAR-OLDS -- The most dangerous thing on a ski slope is a 1S- year-old boy going flat out who doesn't care if he gets killed or if he kills some- body else. Noboby has been able to find the abominable Snowman because he's hid- ing from 15-year-old boys on skis. SKI INSTRUCTION-- All the male ski instructors look like Greek gods. Your wife/girlfriend will spend hours staring at the male ski instructors in those tight ski pants. Female instructors, on the other hand, look weather beaten former col- lege field hockey players. THE MORMONS -- The Mormons are in charge of everything in Utah, includ- ing the state's liquor laws which are so complex it's easier to drive to Wyoming to pick up a six-pack than it is to stay in Utah and try to figure out which day it's not against the law to order a vodka tonic if you're left- handed. If you still want to take up skiing after reading this, good luck. If you don't I'm glad I warned you. If you have decided to join the Mormon church, remember Brigham Young didn't ski either. Will all those wives, didn't have the time. BY SPECIAL ARRANGD MENT WITH HIS DEDRA, THE HOME NEWS CARRYING COLUMNSBYq GRIZZARD Y MOREIND, BECAME THE MOST READ GEORGIA WRITER HIS TIME. BELONGED TO ALL BLvr HE BELONGED TO THIS AREA GEORGIA, OF WHICH WROTE SO OFTEN, WHERE A PORTION OF FROM NEWNAN HOGANSVIIJ IS NAMED HIS HONOR. THE GRIZZARD MUSIEUlVl ESTABLISHED IN 1996, AND EDITING LAB IS BEING BELOVED UNIVERSITY AND TAPI ARE  ABLE FOR SALE BAD BOOT PRODUCTIONS " BOX 191266, ATIN"rA, 31118-1266 AND AT I 1I Second Best Decision I Ever Made A few days ago I heard that fewer young people are taking up smoking today than in past days. This is indeed good news to hear. It has been said by the med- ical profession at habitu- al smoking could reduce life expectancy up to seven years. Even this could be a conservative statement. Young people today are constantly reminded not to smoke because of the health hazard. Each package of cigarettes comes with a warning to remind smokers of the danger of smoking. This has not always been the ease. I started smoking in high school and smoked for 25 years before I had sense enough to quit. I never had any desire to drink alcoholic beverages, but for what I lacked in drinking, I more than made up in smoking. Like many other young people growing up on a farm, I started smoking rab- bit tobacco, eurn stalks, and even ground coffee. Rabbit tobacco grew wild and was readily accessible until we could buy smoking tobacco. You could buy a tin or pack- age of smoking tobacco with two packages of cigarette leaves to last longer than the more expensive pack- age of "ready rolled" ciga- rettes some called "tailor made." My brother and I would slip out back of the barn to smoke after school. Our grandfather would catch us and tell us, "Go up in the peach orchard if you are going to smoke. You boys are going to set the barn afire with those matches." He didn't seem concerned at all about the health aspect of smoking. I do remember Grandpa saying, "You boys keep smoking and it will stunt your growth." I took no stock in his warnings because by the time I was 15 years old I was already six feet tall and still grow- ing. I NEVER gave any seri- ous thought to quit smoking until I was totally hooked. You would begin to hear about lung cancer and tuberculosis. I would tell myself, "I can quit smoking anytime I want to." How could I make a statement like this, when I had never even tried to quit? It was not until we mar- ried and had several chil- dren before I gave any seri- ous thought to quit smok- ing. Soon after we moved to Manchester in 19S9, I decided to give it another try. I talked to Dr. Calvin Jackson about my efforts to quit. He had been a chain smoker mad had quit "cold turkey." I questioned Dr. Jackson, "How long will it be before I will quit crav- ing a cigarette?" He looked me straight in the eye and said, "I've been quit for five years, and I feel at thnes I could smoke one as long as from here to Warn Springs." | I could relate to this. B this time I'd say I ha stopped smoking fift times, only to succumb tl 9i0ti0e qrgjngs at wed mbmSi:  hoae less for a while. ON blARCH 7,19631 lee Manchester about S a.m. el route to Macon to checl logs. I opened a package o cigarettes after breakfast When I finished checkinl the logs somewhere aroun 2 p.m., I reached for er cigarette. Alas, the age was empty! I threw the empty age awa "You crazy "gump, smoke  package of cigarettes i about eight hours. Just fo that, you can't have er cigarette today." The next day I those words. I I've stopped smoking, haven't had one today. won't say it hasn't tough. It has proven to the second best decision ever made in my life. ] The best decision w when we got married Here's the Full Christmas Story What is Christmas all about? It is quite possible that the vast majority of the peo- ple living in this part of the world known as the Bible belt know the real meaning of Christmas: the time of year set aside to celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ. We see Nativity scenes, plays portraying the birth of Jesus, and hear the story put to music, but is Christmas just about the birth of Jesus? Luke 2:11 says, "For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord" In this verse of scripture, we find not only a message about the birth of Jesus, but we also find a mes- sage about the purpose for the birth of Jesus. It is possle to state the whole Christmas in two words: problem and solution. Jesus had to be born because man had a problem. The problem was not just political that he needed a king, the problem wasn't just physical that he needed a physician, the problem was- n't just emotional that he needed a counselor, but the problem was spiritual that he needed a savior. Human kind faced the problem of sin and death and the solution is. in God and his son Jesus Christ. The Bible says in Romans 6:23, "For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord." The first gift ever given was God's gift of his son. We recognize the babe in the manger at Christmas time, but let's be reminded that the same child in the manger, was the savior on the cross. Christmas is not just about the birth of a baby, it is about the provision of savior. May we not forget the whole story of Christmas: the story of a problem and the story of a solution. The whole human race is faced with the problem, but thanks be unto God the human race has been offered a solution. This year, as gifts are being given and received, do not forget to receive the greatest gift: the one from Heaven itself. John 3:16 says, "For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begot- ten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life". That verse of scripture tells us all of humanity has been offered tbat special git and the only means of rec hag it is by grace throu$ faith. This year, ff you have r received this gift of eter  life, why not now? The folks at the Antio Baptist Church wishes the Merriest of Christm and it is the prayer of An that you receive the great: gift of all, the gift of God] Son as your Savio#. Me.r Chmtm0000- We lcome )vur letters. Please rmil them to: The Hogansville Home News