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Manchester, Georgia
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December 21, 2000     The Hogansville Herald
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December 21, 2000
 

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Opinions & Ideas, PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILL, HOME NEWS - DECEMBER 21, 2000 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS usPs 620-04o A 6rimc uhliraon MIIlard B, Gdrnes, President MmE PUBI .ISttER]ADVFATISING DmECrOR JOHN KUYKENDALL ASSOCIA'IX PUBLISIWJffEDrrOR BRYAN GEV ASSOCIATE EDWOR JAYNE GOLDSTON BUSINE&S ]VIANA G FA Phone t 706,) 846-3188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogansville, Gcorgia :J230 Southern Boys Stay That Way, Always Last week I sat down and wrote my annual letter to Santa. After all, Christmas is almost here and I don't want to be for- gotten. Heck, it's worked for 42 years, there's no need to take chances now. As I was writing the letter, it occurred to me that the list has- n't really changed that much over the years. You would think it would be quite different with all the modern technology and advances in electronic gadgets and so forth, but it hasn't. I guess the reason is due to my being a true southern boy. You see, southern boys never grow up. We remain children our entire lives. We have our play toys, same as they've always been, just on a bigger and more costly scale. When I was a child every southern boy wanted a gun. I begged my Dad for a .22 rifle and a 12 gauge shotgun every Christmas for years. I loved to hunt and it took a few years to break his will, but I finally did. To show how similar kids are today, they s..al.for guns for Christmas. However, I still haven;t b6en ib] to'figure out what they hunt with a .9 millime- ter pistol. Buying for a southern male really isn't that hard to do. Being a southern boy myself, I decided to pass" along a few gift ideas for all my friends out there. I want to make sure their wives and girl- friends purchase gifts they will appreciate. IF YOU HAVE TO make a pur- chase for a southern boy who has everything and would like to know how he will rank the gift on a scale from one to ten, here are a few ideas: If you have a hunter in your fancily and he has it all, the guns, bows, decoys, clothing, etc. here is a gift that can never miss with that sportsman in your life. Give him something that is practical and useful. A new choke chain for his dog. Yes sir, that's one thing he won't buy for himself. There's no need to replace it unless it breaks, just because it's rusty and leaves a stain around the dog's neck doesn't mean a thing. It's a gift he and his best friend can appreciate for years to come. This would rank around a six with most southern males. If he owns a hunt- ing dog, make that an eight. Let's face it, every true south- ern boy owns a pickup. There are three things he must have to make the truck complete. If he doesn't have one of these, he'll love you forever if you buy it for him. First, he needs a gun rack. If he's a true southerner, he proba- bly already has one because it's offered as an option by most Southern car dealerships. However, if he doesn't and you buy it for him, that's a gift that would rank about a ten. A true southern boy and his weapons should never be far apart. It's a man thing, honey. Kind of like a woman and her makeup. A woman never knows when she may have to repowder her nose and a southern male never knows when he'll get a chance to kill a critter. The second most important thing is a tool box. So what if he doesn't own tools? The box is on the truck for looks anyway. So don't confuse practicality with reality. This is another gift that would poll about nine or ten. The third thing the truck must have is a dog box. What! Your man doesn't own a dog? Then forget gifts one and two'cause he ain't no true southerner anyway. Unfortunately, if your man is a true southerner and you purchase this gift for him, it only ranks about a six. You see, most south- ern men want to show off their fine pooch. The box is only used during hunting season. The box goes on the truck as soon as hunt- ing season starts. It doesn't mat- ter if his Rover is a mutt he found on the roadside. When hunting season roils around, into the box Rover goes and all of sudden, he is transformed into a champion bloodline hunting dog. SOME OTHER items that will be sure hits with a southern male include Copenhagen snuff, Redman chew or Marlboro ciga- rettes. Every true southern male either dips, chews or smokes. If he doesn't, well you know the answer by now. However, if he's a true southerner this is a gift that wluld rank about a seven. Add the next gift I'm about to tell you about and it jumps to a ten real- ly quickly. ON A FINAL note and laying all kidding aside, I just wanted to say, "Merry Christmas to each of you and I hope Santabrings you the present your heart desires.". HOGANSVgA HOME NEws is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 6204340. Subscription rates by mail: $16in Tnmp, Heard or Meriwether Counties; $20 a year elwhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230. FOR SUBSCRUONS call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, E O. Box 426, Manchester. Georgia 31816. POSTMAS'rER: Send "address changes to P. O. Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. STAff Publisher and Advertising Director .................................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher 'and Editor ..................................................  ............. John Kuykendall Associate Editor...: .............................................................................................. Bryan Geter Assistant Editor ........................................................................................... Rob Richardson Business Manager ........................................................................................ Jayne Goldston Staff Writers ....................................................................... Michael C. Snider, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager ........................................................................ Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ................................................................................................. Lori Camp Assistant Editor ........................................................................................... Rob Richardson Composing ..................................................... Valinda Ivery, Deborah Smith, Lauren King Legals ............................................................................................................ Jayne Goldston Receptionist and Classifieds .............................................................................. Cleta Young Production Manager .............................................................................................. Todd Laird Pressroom ....... . ......................................................... David Boggs and Wayne Grochowski COm'OnATE OmcEns President .................................................................................................... Millard B. Grimes Vice President ........................................................................................ Charlotte S. Grimes Socretary ................................................................................................ Laura Grimes Cofer Recalling His Best Christmas Gift I was on a call-in radio show in Birmingham, Ala. When you write a book, they make you trav- el and do call-in radio shows. Publicity is my life. We were in the second hour in Birmingham. A lady had com- plained about something I'd writ- ten about Oral Roberts, somebody else wanted to know if I planned to get married again, and then a man called and said he knew my late father. "He taught me in high school in Atlanta," the man said. "He was an unforgettable character." Indeed. A number of peo- ple have contacted me over the years and said they had come across Lewis, St. One such person called and said, "Your daddy owes me 300 dollars. I let him borrow it in Kingsport, Tenn., in 1962." After informing the indi- vidual of my father's demise, I asked him, "how long did you know my father before you lent him the 300 dollars?" "About an hour," was the reply. "My good man," I said, "you are one of many with the same experience." MY FATHER WAS a lot of things, but more than anything else, he was a soldier. He served in World War II and in Korea. The Purple Hearts and the Bronze Star he earned hang on my office wall. In Korea, his outfit was over- run by the Chinese communists. He survived by hiding under dead comrades and later by hiding for 16 days in a cave, as his enemy walked about him. When he finally made it back to the American lines, his feet were severely frostbitten, he was suffering from malnutrition, and he would never again be the man who went off to war a sec- ond time in 1950. He returned home to Fort Benning, I was four. He drank heavily. He screamed out in the night. Eventually, he left my mother and went AWOL and spent the rest of his life roaming, drink- ing, and living off his consider- able charm. I have no idea how many different jobs my daddy held between the time he left the army and his death in 1970, but some- how he always managed to be able to get a teaching position when- ever he wanted one. "Your daddy," the man on the radio told me, "would make us laugh with all his carryings- on, and he would tell us about what happened to him in the war. And the thing I remember most was how he used his experience to teach us never to give up no mat- ter how bad things looked. "He said there were times in Korea he felt it would just be easier on him to die than to live in the situation he was in. "He told us how his feet were swollen and bleeding and how he was afraid to move in that cave because the enemy might find him. But he said he just made up his mind he wasn't going to die out there, and that's what pulled him through." WE'D BEEN ON the line a long time. I thanked the caller, but he had more. "I was in Vietnam," he said. "I was wounded and was left behind in a hot landing zone. "I didn't know if anybody was coming back for me or if anyone would find me. But I hid and I held on and I "I wanted to give, up, but I kept thinking about father. If Captain Grizzard make it, I told myself, so could I give him credit for my alive today. He was a great I thanked the caller more time - for perhaps the Christmas gift I've ever had. BY SPECIAL WITH HIS WIDOW DEDRA, ED GRIZZARD, WHO GREW UP NEARBY MORELAND, GEORGIA WRITER OF HIS GRIZZARD TO AMERICA BELONGED TO THIS AREA GEORGIA, OF WHICH SO OFTEN OF 1-85 FROM NEWNAN HOGANSVILI IS NAMED IN HONOR. THE LEWIS MUSEUM WAS ESTABLISHED (!ORELAND IN 1996, AND WDITING LAB IS DEDICATED TO HIS BELOVED UNIVERSITY SALE THROUGH BAD PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 AND BOOK AND MUSIC NATIONWIDE. Christmas Evolves Through the From a Christmas Past Jesus the Christ is the central figure of the season which cele- brates His birth, but Christmas, as it is observed in America today, combines the customs, traditions and contributions Of many lan/fs, religions and men ............ Who were some of the people who have made Christmas the greatest of holidays? The follow- ing deserve a portion of the cred- it: ST. LUKE - Surely, the good doctor and writer of the third gospel deserves the next place after Jesus as the architect of Christmas and its joyful message. Only Luke, among the four biog- raphers of Jesus, related the details of His birth. It is from Luke that we learn of the pil- grimage to Bethiehem; the birth in a manger behind a crowded inn; the shepherds who were vis- ited by a heavenly host, pro- claiming "peace on earth, good will to men." Except for Luke, these parts of the Christmas story might have been lost to history. ST. MATTHEW - Matthew is the other gospel writer who pro- vides information on Jesus, first days. His emphasis was on the visit of the three Wise Men, which is an integral part of the Christmas story, and was not included in Luke's version. THE EMPEROR CONSTAN- TINE - Constantine is a neglect- ed figure in the Christmas cele- bration, and has never received the credit he deserves for estab- lishing Dec. 25 for the official birthday celebration of Christ. Until Constantine became emperor of the Roman Empire Christians were forced to observe the birthday of their savior in secrecy. More than 300 years passed after that first Christmas at Bethlehem before an official cel- ebration was proclaimed. This was done in 325 A.D. by Emperor Constantine, following his con- version to Christianity. He also decreed Dec. 25 as Christmas Day. The exact date of Jesus' birth is unknown. NICHOLAS THE BISHOP of Myra - Nicholas was a very rich man who lived in a town of Myra in Asia Minor about the same time that Constantine was emperor of the Roman Empire. After his con- version to Christianity, Nicholas gave generously of his goods and money to help the poor. He also made an annual custom of dis- tributing presents to the children of Myra, and thus became known as the children's saint. Saint Nicholas, of course, has come down to us as Santa Claus, which is a Dutch translation of his name. ST. FRANCIS of Assisi and Martin Luther - These two great Christians of the Middle Ages, one a Catholic, the other the founder of Protestantism, did much to preserve the spirit and traditions of Christmas. St. Francis is credited with mak- ing carol singing a part of the Christmas celebration, and Luther was the first to add deco- rations and lights, in the form of candies, to a Christmas tree. CHARLES DICKENS - The most popular novelist of Victorian England was known as the "man who discovered Christmas." But more accurately, he was the man who brought the Christmas celebration back to its full popu- larity. Christmas as a holiday suffered a severe setback during the years from 1643 to 1660 when the Puritans ruled England. The Puritans considered Christmas a pagan holiday, and they forbade any celebration or ceremonies. Although Christmas was offi- cially recognized again when the kingdom was restored, almost 200 years were to pass before it regained its former prominence. Dickens was instrumental in re-popularizing Christmas, and in identifying it as a season for kind- hearted deeds and family gather- ings. CLEMENT MOORE and Thomas Nast ~ These two should be considered together. They took the story of St. Nicholas and added the trappings which transformed him into the modern Santa Claus. Moore, in 1822, wrote the poem "A Visit From St. Nicholas," pop- ularly known as "Twas the Night Before Christmas." St. Nicholas' general appear- ance, the reindeer and sleigh, his leaving of presents under the tree after entering through the chim- ney- all of these Christmas tra- ditions originated in Moore's poem. Nast, the famed political car- toonist, put Moore's word picture into art form.He drew the first "Santa Claus," bearded with red suit and cap. Nast's version of Santa Claus is the one still used today. Many other men (and have helped make Christmas great holiday of today. Church should be mentioned. wrote the famous ,Vir gia there yWas a S Claus, And the writers ful carols and hymns be forgotten, most George Frederick Handel, wrOt( The Christmas, undergone many changes past 2,000 years, - songs and decorations of would have been strange eve t Americans of just 200 They knew not or trees and lights, and did even give presents on Day. And the jolly Englishmen made Christmas the day during Medieval times, plete with flaming yule boughs of holly, would associate today's Christmas their own celebration.But enduring thread that links the Christmases together common factor for old St. Nicholas, St. Martin Luther and our more ern "makers of Christmas" - the Babe of Bethiehem. IN ONE FASHION or they were honoring and ing the birth of Jesus gift to a yearning and world. And despite the excesses we sometimes see Christmas remains a Jesus. He is the influence of Jesus is on the world during than in any other time of the Be Very Careful With Holiday more than 2 hours. After cook- ing, hot foods should be kept at 140 degrees F or above. Cold foods should stay at 40 degree F or below. By keeping foods within these temperature ranges you will prevent the rapid growth of bacteria. Here are some tips on how to maintain safe holding temperatures. Use small serving trays and replace them often This way food is eaten before it can stay too long at room tempera- ture. Keep hot foods hot with chafing dishes, crock-pots, or warming trays. Keep cold foods cold by placing serving dishes in bowls of ice. Buffet style meals are a fre- quent occasion during the holi- day season. However, this type of party, where foods are left out at room temperature for extended periods of time, leaves the door open for some uninvit- ed guests stmh as the bacteria that cause foodborne illness. So how do you keep buffet safe from foodborne illness? The main goal is to cook foods properly and then maintain safe holding temperatures. In other words, keep hot foods hot and cold foods cold. Never keep foods at room temperature for Discard any sat out for two hours or By following these guidelines you can make no uninvited bacteria will your buffet and famil foodborne illness. The Cooperative Service Office provides tional programs, assistance to all people regard to race, color, origin, age, tus. An Opportunity/Affirmat: Action Organization. /