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Manchester, Georgia
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December 25, 2003     The Hogansville Herald
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December 25, 2003
 

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Opinions & Ideas PAGE 4A - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - DEC. 25, 2003 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-040 JOHN KUYKENDALL PUB| JSI IER/EI)ITOR LAURm LEWIS AI)Vt.:RT]S[NG DtRECT(n CIJNT CLAYBR(IK)K Ass( K'IA'rF EDITOR ROB IICHARI)SON ASSISTANT EI)ITOR JAYNE GOLDSTON BUSINESS MANAGER Phone (706) 846-3188 Fax (706) 846-2206 P O. Box 426 ltogansville, Georgia 30230 Damon Evans Has Made History at UGA At the age of 34, Damon Evans has made history by being named the Athletic Director at the University of Georgia. Evans is his own man, but in some ways fol- lowing in his father's footsteps. Damon's father, Sam Evans, was the first-ever black elected official in the small north Georgia town of Oakwood. When he was elect- ed to office and made history, it didn't make the headlines of major newspapers around the state or the nation, it only made the front page of the small weekly paper (like the one you're reading) that serves Oakwood. However, every major daily newspaper in the state and around the nation, every television and so on and so forth has announced that Damon has been flamed the first black Athletic Director (AD) in the Southeastern Conference (SEC). Not only is Damon the first black AD in the SEC, but he is also the youngest. That put's him in the record book twice. MANY MAYbe concerned that because Damon Evans is so young, that he may not be ready for the AD job just yet. I wouldbeg to differ. Evans was a solid football player during his stint at the University of Georgia and has the knowledge and ability to do the job. Vince Dooley agrees with that as weJ1. "He's better prepared than I was," Dooley told reporters when asked about it. "He's been better coached." I agree with that state- ment: there are not many coaches around better than Vince Dooley. The thing that will help Evans prepare most for his new job is that he will work side-by-side with Vince for the next six months preparing to take over when Dooley does finally step down. Dooley's contract will expire on July 1, 2004. The young AD will learn a lot during that time from Dooley and should be ready for the challenge of the job when he has to stand on his own two feet. Dooley will certainly give him all the help he needs dur- ing the six month period and even after should a need or question rise, because we all know that Evans was Dooley's choice for the position. UGA PRESIDENT Michael Adams was encour- aged by many to select Evans for the job. The reason he was because I became convinced Damon Evans was the best person for the job," Adams said. "Any side benefits are icing on the cake. This is a very competent person who I am convinced is ready for this. He's here because he's the per- son who most deserved the job." Some have said that Adams selected Evans only because of the pressure that was applied for him to do so. I'm not so sure that is the case, but naming Evans as AD will certainly appease some of the UGA fans that are still angry over the way Adams handled Dooley's situation recently. Evans hiring has been received well in the athletic department and it calmed some of the concerns that an outsider would be hired and tremendous changes might have been made. That does not mean there will not be staff changes or other changes forthcoming. That is something we'll all just have to wait and see about. FOR HIS TROUBLE, Evans will be paid $250,000 annually, with a possibility of $50,000 in incentives. A pret- ty nice salary for a 34-year- old. At present Dooley is paid $333,000 annually. Is Evans worth that kind of money? I guess that remains to be seen, but he sure has made an impact at the University. In the late 90s, Evans was named assistant commission- er of the SEC. Early this year he was named one of the most 101 powerful minorities in sports by Sports Illustrated magazine. For three years, he has been Georgia's senior associ- ate athletic director in charge of internal affairs. In that role, he quickly impressed Dooley with his handling of the Athletic Association's budget, which grew from $28 million to $45 during his tenure. EVANS HAS said he wants to take the athletic program to the next level. That will be a tough challenge considering that UGA already has one the encouraged so was because, nation's most financially sta- Evans was the best candidate ble and athletically competi- for the job. tive programs. However, we "The decision was made should all wish him luck. THE HO{;ANSVILLE HOME NEW'S is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications. at 3051 R(x)seveh HighwaL lanchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 6,0-040. Subscription rates by nmil: $20 in l'roup, Harris or Meriwether Counties: $24 a year elsewhere. Prices include all ales taxes. PerkKlical postage paid at Hogansville. Georgia 30230.Single cop), 0. FOR SUK;CRIPTIONS call (7061 846-3188 or write to Circulation Mamtgcr, Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester. Georgia 31816. PE;TMAsTER: Send address changes to P. O. Box 426. Hogansville. GA 30230. STAFF Publisher and FAiler ............................................................................ John Kukyendall S, dverlising Director .................................................................................. l.aurie Lewis Ass(:iate Fklitor ................................................................................... Clint Claybreok Business Manager. ................................................................................ Jayne Golds|on Assistant Editor ............................................................................  ........ Rob Richardson ;taff Writers .......................................................................... Brsan Geter, Billy Bryant ?omposing ............................................................ Dewayne Flowers, Robert Weems [,egals ...................................................................................................... Jayne Goldston ?irculation Manager ............................................................... Barbara Arlene Steerman Press Manager ................................................................................. Wayne Grt:howski pressroom Assistants ..................... 'Lan'y Colleges, Zaddie l)ixon,l)amell McCauley Vlailroom Di:,tribution ............................................................................... David Boggs CORgORATE OFE|CERS [:'resident ...................................... , ...................................................... Millard B. Grimes Vice President .................................................................................. Charlotte S. Grimes Executive Vice Presidem and Secretary ........................................ Laura Grimes Corer Freasurer ....................................................................................... Kathy Grimes Garrett Legal Counsel and Assistant Secretary ............................................... James S. Grimes The Lonely Day His Daddy Die From Lewis Grizzard's collection "Won't You Come Home Billy Bob Bailey?" Written in 1979 August 12, 1970, Claxton, Georgia. The devil in the bot- tle, and perhaps a thousand more that inevitably hound a fallen hero, finally won the battle. There are scenes that will never leave you. One such, for me took place here in lit- tle Claxton, where they make fruitcakes. It was an August morning, hot and damp out- side. I stood inside a tiny hos- pital room where a 58-year- old mn was near death. It was my daddy. Around me stood a few others who also cared about him, too. One was a preach- er. As the end neared, the preacher asked that we all bow our heads, and he prayed. He osked the Lord to take the soul about to depart the ravaged body on the bed. I said a prayer of my own. I asked the Lord to ignore the preacher and leave the soul where it was. That was the only mira- cle I ever prayed for. I was- n't ready to give the man up just yet, and, frankly, I thought the preacher was rushing things a bit. The preacher asked that we bow our heads again, and we did, and he prayed again, but I forgot about what this time. I WANTED to say some- thing dramatic when he had finished, something befitting the life we had just seen pass. I said something stupid, instead. I said, "He hated hot weather, you know." The only comfort I could find in the moment was that the man wouldn't have to live through the oppressive Georgia heat the afternoon was sure to offer. He was a big man, a fat man, and the heat was ways his dreaded enemy, I recalled. You think of the strangest things at times like those. I had held his hand dur- ing the final minutes, and I will always be thankful for that. I have often wondered since if, somewhere in his fleeting sub conscious, he had known I was there. Probably not, but it is a fantasy worth keeping. He was alone a great deal during his life, which was the real cause of his death, and I will always hope he had some faint knowledge of the fact that there was an audience for the last act he performed. How he happened to die here, in this outpost, is still somewhat of a mystery to me. Better, I thought then and I think now, years before on a battlefield of some historic worth. SEVEN of his 58 years had been devoted to combat, and he had distinguished him- self and had inspired others, I have heard. Better he had gone in the midst of some heroic adventure, even at a much younger age, than here between white hospital sheets. Hb had found nothing but unhappiness since his last war, Korea, and he had wan- dered alone and lost. He was just passing through this, his last stop, when some vital organ stopped its function. The nurse came in. Then the doctor, who noted the time before he pulled the sheet over the man's blue face. Later, someone handed me his earthly belongings in a plastic bag. It was a sm bag Inside were shoes, soc  .A :': . -.t" Clauu unuerwear, trousers, a sml, an empty wallet, an old wat xlemw and a cheap ring. psplce J Fifty-eight years, they can put what is left you in a small plastic bag. I was here the other day but there was time away, to put the scene together again. I owe the that much - to ponder sionally how his end come. I owe him a 1 that. He's the one who me his name, for one For another, he left me a stockpile of stories, of which are even true, keep a roof over my head. BY SPECIAL WITH ms WIDOW, DEDRA, HOME NEWS ED COLUMNS BY THE LATE BY MOR:ELAND, AND BECAME MOS:- WIDELY READ WRITER OF HIS TIME. BOOKS AND TAPES PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX ATLANTA, GA 31118-1266 AND BOOK AND MUSIC STORES WIDE. Don't Forget Meaning of Christmas As I sit here this morning, it is Monday, Dec. 22. Christmas is only three days away. The mall stores are filled with last minute shoppers searching for that perfect, or near perfect, gift, the grocery stores are seeing folks get ready for that Christmas din- ner, or breakfast as the case may be, and the excitement in the hearts of children grows minute by minute. These things have become the usual signs of Christmas. I must admit that it is easy to get caught up in all the traditions that go along with this time of year, even in the church. There have bene numer- ous dinners and gatherings, there have been play prac- tices and special plans, but the time has come to slow down and even stop. To often the frustration, the anxiety, and the busy schedules take us away from the real meaning of this sea- son. Today I want us to con- sider what the angel said to the shepherds while they watched their flocks by night The Bible says in Luke 2:10 "And the angel said unto them, Fear not: for, behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people." This time offyear is sup, posed to be one of great joy and peace, yet for some, it is everything but joy and peace The joy only comes when the last gift is wrapped, some- times only seconds before it is to be torn open. THE PEACE only comes when all the family and friends have gone home. If the Bible declares this is to be a time of great joy, then why do so many have a lack of real joy? The truth of the matter is, this world has a disillusioned :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: ........ -s . !i,00i0 i perception of real joy and peace. This world only thinks joy comes from presents and that peace only comes from an absence of trouble. Please understand today that the real peace and joy the angel s spoke of to the shepherds comes not from the material world, but from the spiritual world. The basis for joy and the foundation for peace is found only in Jesus. Joy and peace are things that come from the inside, not the outside. The reason so many are not find- ing that which they are searching for is because they are looking in the wrong place. Today, as things ly will begin to slow you, I want to invite you look within for that which are searching. True peace and true j( can only be where Jesus abides. You see, it is this time year that we celebrate birth of Jesus Christ, Son and our Savior, and it in" th "persOn Jesus that joy and peace be found. STOP TODAY and see you have Jesus as personal Savior. It is when you come to that you can know the joy that was promised to shepherds. It is my that if you do not know Jesus of Nazareth as own, today you will come know him and when you cot to know him, it is then y can truly have a "Mer Christmas. 50 Years Ago giw/atis Ctt= Held tMeee Meeinq Tla .... "  ........ .: : ::" :: -..: ,: , " /i:,, .7.", " ...... .. :, ,.: : ........ :- , ..... :.': ", ..... .......... Hottaad Wore :..-'- : - Pieces First l " " '  .7:.., . ']Li,':' ' i.::: " ':':Tree. ..,, ,..-culture . j?.?. ........  ,..: ...... ..,.... ,.,,:::).?S: ..... :, :-- , ............. i | i In the Hogansville Herald Predecessor to the HogansvilieHome News On Christmas Eve of 1953, the Hogansville had stories ranging from ,'Family Quarrel Ends in Death" to "Two Hogansville Players Named On All State Team Football" on the front page. The tale of family tragedy reported that on the pre- vous Sunday, Leonard Smith, who lived on Baptist Drive was fatally stabbed by his wife, Clara Maude Smith fol- lowing a quarrell between the two. Clara Maude had sat up during most of the night with a sister in the City County hospital and upon retuming to her home had gone to bed, according to that report. "The husband came in later in the (Sunday) morning drunk andbegan to berate his wife for being away," the newspaper reported. "The quarrel that followed ended in! the stabbing affray..,." The youngsters making the all-state football team were Joe Leatherwood and Billy Pike. Leatherwood was an end on the Hogansville team and Pike was the quar- terback. Hogansville was the only town that placed two men on the first team, according to that story. In another Page 1 story, The Herald reported that 'he merchants of Hogansville and surrounding area have unanimously agreed to close both Friday and Saturday" of Christmas week so families and store personnel "may enjoy a vacation on Christmas." Christmas Day fell on a Friday that year. oA Hines Motor Co. advertisement invited the pub- lic to come see ,'q'he New 1954 Chevrolet" featuring Chevrolet's"exclusive Powerglide" and other features such' as "automatic window and Seat Controls. Another tidbit of news that Christmas E'*ve: Hogansville was to receive $514,000 from a $37 million state bond issue for "a new elementary school,'! an addi- tion of a lunch room and shop department at the high. school a shop room, a room for the homemakers class and additional class rooms at the West End (then called the Colored) School. The Belk-Gallsnt Co. store in HogansvUle was adver- tising "one group of men's Suits" for only $21.44. At the Royal Theate in Hogansville, Randolph Scoff was starring in 'q'hunder Over The Plains," and Dennis O'Keefe and Eveleyn Keyes could be seen in "One Big Affair." L' ,\[I/L'I'IC3