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December 28, 2000     The Hogansville Herald
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December 28, 2000
 

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Opinions & Ideas PAGE 4 - HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS - DECEMBER 28, 2000 THE HOGANSVILLE HOME NEWS USPS 620-040 MIKE HAI PUBHSHER/ADVERTISG DmECqR JOHN KUYKENDAIL ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER]EDITOR BRYAN GETER ASSOCIATE EDITOR JAYNE GOLDSTON B USL__SS MANAGER Phone (706).8463188. Fax (706) 846-2206 P. O. Box 426 Hogansville, Georgia 230 New Year Brings New Opportunities Christmas has come and gone for another year. I hope that each of you had a happy holiday and that Santa was good to you. As the Christmas holiday ends, we turn our thoughts to the New Year. I always become excit- ed each New Year with anticipa- tion of what another year will bring. Last year was very excit- ing. It began with the worries of what Y2K would bring and con- cluded with what will prove to be a long remembered presidential election. But at least as the New Year begins we know who our President will be. I was wonder- ing a couple of weeks ago if we would begin a New Year not know- ing whom our President would be. I am of the opinion that 2001 will be just as exciting. Of course, the Electoral College process will be under very close scrutiny this year. So, 2001 could bring a change to our election process. At this juncture, most Americans would probably support a change. WEATHER could prove to be very. interesting during the pcorning yll. Last year, - the area went through a very dif- ficult time with the drought. We still have not received the amount of rainfall needed, but our num- bers have improved to some degree. This year, we should see a very wet spring, but unfortu- nately a very hot summer. Headlines about record temper- atures will be seen during the remaining winter months, and summer heat will generate a few headlines of its own. Yes, 2001 should prove to be another, exciting year as far as news is concerned, I hope no one thinks I'm trying to predict the news. I'm only repeating what has been already been said by the experts. With the New Year also comes an opportunity for change for each of us. At this time of year, we are all eager to make New Year's resolutions. We intend to make our lives better by doing so. Unfortunately, we always for- get about them as soon as New Year's Day passes. Sometimes however, Lady Luck has a way of holding us to some of our resolu- tions. LAST YEAR, I made a reso- lution to quit smoking and I did. However, the only reason I did quit was for health reasons. I did not keep that resolution. Now that I have quit smoking, I need to lose weight and visit the gym about three times a week to stay in shape. If I don't, I'm going to risk another health problem. Since I've quit smoking I eat too much. If I keep gaining weight, it will most likely force me to have another health problem down the road. So, I'm going to try my best to eat better and work out. Notice I did not make a reso- lution to do this. I promised myself to try and make a good effort to do so. I've never been much on mak- ing resolutions, simply because they are too easy to break. I have found it's better to make yourself a promise and then do everything in your power to keep the promise ....... That's exactly how I quit smoking. I made a promise to myself that I would make every effort possible to quit. I sat a tar- get date of Nov. 1, 2000. The first thing I always did when I woke in the morning was to smoke a cigarette, but that day was dif- ferent. I had already decided that on Nov. 1 when I woke up I was not going to light up and I didn't. I had just opened a pack of ciga- rettes the night before and I left them lying on my bed stand that morning when I left for work. I made it through the first day and when I got home that night, I picked up that pack of Camels and threw them in the trash can. "I made it through one day, I believe I can make it another," I told myself. It's funny, but here it is over a month later and I'm telling myself the same thing. I'M SHARING this with each of you for a reason. The point I'm trying to make is a simple one, whether you make a resolution or a promise to yourself this New Year's you can keep it. All you have to do is make an effort. Take the first step and you'll find that the second and third will come much easier. I've always thought I couldn't quit smoking because I didn't have the will power to do so. I've learned through this experience that will power is simply a matter of mak- ing up your mind to take that first step. Happy New Year and good luck with your New Year's reso- lutions. THE HOGANSVILLE HOM NEws is published weekly by the Star-Mercury Publishing Company, a division of Grimes Publications, at 3051 Roosevelt Highway, Manchester, Georgia 31816. USPS 620-040. Subscription rates by mail: $16 in Troup, Heard or Meriwether Counties; $20 a year elsewhere. Prices include all sales taxes. Periodical postage paid at Hogansville, Georgia 30230. FOR suascmPnONS call (706) 846-3188 or write to Circulation Manager, Star Mercury Publications, P. O. Box 426, Manchester, Georgia 31816. POS'TMA,grR: Send address changes to P. O, Box 426, Hogansville, GA 30230. STAFF Publisher and Advertising Director .................................................................... Mike Hale Associate Publisher and FAitor ................................................................. John Kuykendall Associate Editor .......... : ....................................................................................... Bryan Gcter Assistant Editor ........................................................................................... Rob Richardson Business Manager ....................................................................................... Jayn Goldsmn Staff Writers ....................................................................... Michael C. Snider, Billy Bryant Assistant Advertising Manager ........................................................... ............. Laurie Lewis Advertising Sales ................................................................................................. Loft Camp Assistant Editor ........................................................................................... Rob Richardson Composing ..................................................... Valinda Ivery, Deborah Smith,  King Leg .......................................................................... t ................................. Jayne Goldston Receptionist and Classifieds .............................................................................. Cleta Young Production Manager .............................................................................................. Todd Laird Pressroom ................................................................ avid Boggs and Wayne Grochowski ComoT Oncms President .................................................................................................... Millard B. Grimes Vice Ptidem ........................................................................................ Charlo S. Grimes sm.y ................................................................................................ Laura Crimes Cofer Playing Second Fiddle Isn't So Bad Sometimes when we begin to feel our oats, we might even con- vince ourselves that we are the most important person in our com- munity or company. When we let ourselves get into that frame of mind, maybe we could best cure our ego problem by exchanging places for a day with some other apparently important community or company person. A story is told about a mer- chant marine captain and his chief engineer. The two men got into an argument about which of them was more important to the ship. To settle the argument, they final- ly agreed to swap positions for a day. The captain went down to the engine room and the engineer went up to the bridge. A few hours passed and the captain ascended the bridge covered with soot and oil. "You have got to get down to the engine room," the captain shouted to the engineer while wav- ing a wrench in the air. "I can't get any power from the engines," he said. "Of course you can%" the engi- neer responded to the captain, with no effort to hide the anguish in his voice. "We are grounded," he cried. Seems to me the moral of that story would be twofold. First, don't ever fool yourself into believing that you are the most important person on "the ship." You may be an important person, but usually you can find folks of equal or high- er status if you will just look around. The second thing the story tells me is that even though our job might be an important one and we know how to do it well, there are many more important jobs on '"the ship" done equally well that we simply cannot do. And there is nothing wrong with that because people of different talents who work well together as a team most oftentimes bring us our success- es. ANOTHER STORY is told of an argument. Everyone knows that disputes among employees sometimes leads to disruptions that take a toll on accomplishing our objectives. The story is about a military unit quarrel between two young soldiers that had them really going at each othe and causing much confusion within the ranks. An army manual gives the fol- lowing advice for resolving dif- ferences between soldiers: Assign ".. Without good seo ond fiddles, we won't achieve many s00s- es, or stay in harmony with each other." the men to washing the same win- dows, one from the inside, the other from the outside. After they have washed a whole barrac while staring at each other for a day, the problem usually will dis- appear and they will end up laugh- ing. You business or professional folks certainly do not have a racks with many so maybe you could come up a common two dogmatic ones to work by side for a day. Finally, someone famous conductor of a ment he considered the ficult to play. The replied, "Second fiddle. I plenty one who can play second with enthusiasm, that is a lem. Without have no harmony." IN CLOSING, let's go briefly where we started. we think we are the most taut person in the company, then have our deflated a bit when we really are not. When that happens it's remember the words of the ductor. There are ready to be the most person, but few who are play second fiddle with asm. And without dles, we won't achieve many cesses, or stay in harmony, each other. Have a great New Year!ll No Matter What, Winning Does Ma Have you ever thought about what it takes for any team whether it be pro, college, high school or even a recreation team to become a consistent winner? Last Saturday afternoon as I watched the Denver Broncos battle the 49ers in Mile High Stadium, the "Orange Crush" fans were vividly in support of the home team, ............ It has been mil:e there has been an empty seat in Denver's Mile High Stadium. Soon they will have a new sta- dium in sight of Mile High. Contrast that with Atlanta. The Falcons, even playing in a closed dome, can't draw enough fans to lift the television black- out. This problem started in the very beginning when the Smith family was awarded the foot- ball pro franchise over Lindsey Hopkins, who was awarded the Denver franchise a year later. Rankin Smith was chosen primarily because he was a Georgia man and a graduate of the University of Georgia. THERE ARE several lines you must follow in order to become a winner, and it is evi- dent the Smith family followed none that would make them a winner. During the late sixties and seventies the Falcons drew smaller crowds to Atlanta- Fulton County Stadium. Why? Simply because they were not winning. It was about this same time in 1966 Georgia Tech lost their outstanding coach, Bobby Dodd and attendance eventually dropped so much Tech officials tore down some 18,000 seats in the old horseshoe at Grant Field in Atlanta. MEANWHILE, over in Athens, a 31-year-old freshman coach Vince Dooley and a gray haired basketball coach, who was better known for his bas- ketball "shuffle" than anything else, arrived at UGA Soon Sanford Stadium was sold out as soon as season tick- ets went on sale in the spring. It became necessary to increase the Sanford Stadium capacity to 85,000. Why the big change? Simply because the Bulldogs were win- ning championships and going bowling on a regular basis. A former UGA ticket man- ager, Virginia Whitehead, told me this story soon after Coach Joel Eaves came to Georgia in 1964. It seems that Coach Dodd, who was athletic director as well as head football coach at Georgia Tech, would call Coach Butts, who held the same posi- tion in Athens. He would give him Tech's football schedule for the next year. Tech usually played seven or more home games (all sell- outs). Coach Butts usually sched- uled only three home games in Athens and these were played while Tech was out of town. Mrs. Whitehead told me Coach Eaves was very courte- ous to Coach Dodd but told him that he planned to schedule six or seven home games each fall, and it will be up to "us" to have There are several lines you must follow in order to become a winner, and it is evi- dent the Smith family followed none that would make them a winner. a team that will be interesting enough to draw the crowds. The rest is history! When Coach Eaves came to Athens in 1964, the athletic department was handling just over two million dollars annu- ally. This year I understand this figure will be over 30 million dollars. Why and how did this hap- pen? One word, my friend, and that word is winning. Meanwhile, Georgia Tech has won wayward fans back to their fold. How? Again the nemb answer is winning. .,etired There is talk now of adobe wif seats at Grant Field. L Sur .'ayetU HOW DO the Falcons ser, Mr after 35 years in Atlanta? No closer to a winner than they were 3,5 ago when Rankin Smith awarded the franchise. The.fan base ia here iv state of  the Braves can testify. It's one thing for and being a good loser or it not whether you won or lost how you played the game. The truth of the most men get a belly full of l ing and in a hurry. Everybody loves Soon after we moved Manchester and in the sixties, we visit us. They asked one of our what he wanted to grew up. The young man in the face and want to play high school ball for the Blue Devils and to college at the UniversitY Georgia. Once out of college like to play pro ball with Green Bay Packers, ball with the New Yankees." Then he looked up at me asked, "Daddy, basketball?" The answered his question by ing, "No doubt he'll play the Celtics." Who said winning matter? How Remarkable Strategy Evelyn, the 87-year-old, three-term president of our Woman's Club, was overjoyed at the total of 44 who would attend our annual Christmas luncheon at The Hazelhurst House. Details of decor, favors and entertainment had been efficiently worked out for some time. (In the past Evelyn received national honor for her leadership skills.) A call came to me the morn- ing of the party from Evelyn asking if I would take her to the event - her severe arthritis would prevent her from enter- ing her car and managing the necessary walker. Of course I was glad to - I'd been to Woodbury the night before for Flint River Academy's musical program and proudly heard grandson Dean sing solo "0 Holy Night." As we arrived, Evelyn looked for her neighbor, Helen's car. She had left earlier to do some arrangements. We'd noticed an accident on another street and Helen came to mind, but we didn't know until later that she was involved in a col- lision. She was not injured and we were thankful she could later join us. Her car was totaled. Members and guests min- gled and admired the beauty of the surroundings. Each place setting had a decorated name card and a ribbon bow basket with a cup holding red and green candy. There was also a rib- boned red cord with a mint attached and a clever verse about "What I Mint To Do." This blessing was asked "Come O Jesus to my night, Make the skies within me bright. May the voices in my mind Sing peace on earth to all mankind. Come when there's no room for thee Come to hidden parts of me. Come to places I don't share, Bring me gracious love and care. Come, bring me humility, May I with the lowly be. Show me values I don't see In the life surrounding me. Come receive the gi bring, Come they're yours, everything. Come be Savior, Lord King Come O Christmas All enjoyed the buffet meal, then seasonal music was Deborah at the vocalist Gina. Words were I vided so all could '"Ne Wish You a Christmas" and "Deck Halls."